Religious Confessions and Confessants: With a Chapter on the History of Introspection

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Houghton Mifflin, 1914 - 562 pages
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Page 395 - If I justify myself, mine own mouth shall condemn me : if I say, " I am perfect," it shall also prove me perverse.
Page 381 - And I said, What shall I do, Lord ? And the Lord said unto me, Arise, and go into Damascus, and there it shall be told thee of all things which are appointed for thee to do.
Page 288 - It no sooner appeared than I found myself delivered from the enemy which held me bound. When the light rested upon me I saw two Personages, whose brightness and glory defy all description, standing above me in the air.
Page 460 - B-region, then, is obviously the larger part of each of us, for it is the abode of everything that is latent and the reservoir of everything that passes unrecorded or unobserved. It contains, for example, such things as all our momentarily inactive memories, and it harbors the springs of all our obscurely motived passions, impulses, likes, dislikes, and prejudices. Our intuitions, hypotheses, fancies, superstitions, persuasions, convictions, and in general all our non-rational operations, come from...
Page 446 - These are processes, customs, opinions, and so forth, which have been carried on by force of habit into a new state of society different from that in which they had their original home, and they thus remain as proofs and examples of an older condition of culture out of which a newer has been evolved.
Page 380 - In thoughts from the visions of the night, when deep sleep falleth on men, Fear came upon me, and trembling, which made all my bones to shake. Then a spirit passed before my face; the hair of my flesh stood up: It stood still, but I could not discern the form thereof: an image was before mine eyes, there was silence, and I heard a voice, saying, Shall mortal man be more just than God?
Page 380 - In thoughts from the visions of the night, When deep sleep falleth on men, .' Fear came upon me, and trembling, Which made all my bones to shake. Then a spirit passed before my face ; The hair of my flesh stood up : It stood still, but I could not discern the form thereof: An image was before mine eyes, there was silence, and I heard a voice, Shall mortal man be more just than God ? Shall a man be more pure than his Maker?
Page 400 - Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites ! for ye pay tithe of mint and anise and cummin, and have omitted the weightier matters of the law, judgment, mercy, and faith : these ought ye to have done, and not to leave the other undone.
Page 314 - I rush out among my pigs rather than remain alone by myself. The human heart is like a millstone in a mill ; when you put wheat under it, it turns and grinds and bruises the wheat to flour ; if you put no wheat, it still grinds on, but then 'tis itself it grinds and wears away.
Page 346 - If to any the tumult of the flesh were hushed, hushed the images of earth, and waters, and air, hushed also the poles of heaven, yea the very soul be hushed to herself, and by not thinking on viii.

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