The Mind at Work in Studying, Thinking, and Reading: A Source Book and Discussion Manual

Front Cover
Scott, Foresman, 1924 - 349 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 223 - I should be glad if I could flatter myself that I came as near to the central idea of the occasion, in two hours, as you did in two minutes.
Page 99 - Could the young but realize how soon they will become mere walking bundles of habits, they would give more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state. We are spinning our own fates, good or evil, and never to be undone.
Page 95 - Habit is thus the enormous fly-wheel of society, its most precious conservative agent. It alone is what keeps us all within the bounds of ordinance, and saves the children of fortune from the envious uprisings of the poor.
Page 99 - That is, be systematically ascetic or heroic in little unnecessary points, do every day or two something for no other reason than that you would rather not do it, so that when the hour of dire need draws nigh, it may find you not unnerved and untrained to stand the test. Asceticism of this sort is like the insurance which a man pays on his house and goods. The tax does him no good at the time, and possibly may never bring him a return. But if the fire does come, his having paid it will be his salvation...
Page 97 - Seize the very first possible opportunity to act on every resolution you make, and on every emotional prompting you may experience in the direction of the habits you aspire to gain.
Page 307 - I dream away my life in others' speculations. I love to lose myself in other men's minds. When I am not walking I am reading; I cannot sit and think. Books think for me.
Page 96 - The great thing, then, in all education, is to make our nervous system our ally instead of our enemy. It is to fund and capitalize our acquisitions, and live at ease upon the interest of the fund. For this we must make automatic and habitual, as early as possible, as many useful actions as we can, and guard against the growing into ways that are likely to be disadvantageous to us, as we should guard against the plague.
Page 146 - Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. That is, some books are to. be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
Page 51 - One must be an inventor to read well. As the proverb says, ' He that would bring home the wealth of the Indies, must carry out the wealth of the Indies.
Page 236 - A prince's banner Wavered, then staggered backward, hemmed by foes. A craven hung along the battle's edge, And thought, ' Had I a sword of keener steel — That blue blade that the king's son bears, — but this Blunt thing!

Bibliographic information