Analysis and Assessment, 1940-1979

Front Cover
Cary D. Wintz
Taylor & Francis, 1996 - 504 pages

Twenty-nine collected essays represent a critical history of Shakespeare's play as text and as theater, beginning with Samuel Johnson in 1765, and ending with a review of the Royal Shakespeare Company production in 1991. The criticism centers on three aspects of the play: the love/friendship debate.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Harlem of Langston Hughes Poetry
24
The AlienandExile Theme in Countee Cullens
32
Negro Fiction in America
43
Bias Fiction and the Negro
55
Introduction to Voices from the Harlem Renaissance
65
The Negros Negro in Negro Literature
74
The Negros Image of the Universe as Reflected in His Fiction
80
The Harlem Literary Renaissance
91
The Black Writer
281
A Renaissance Man in the Harlem Renaissance
303
Jessie Redmon Fauset and the Harlem
313
The Image of the Primitive in Black Letters
325
Towards a Black Aesthetic
336
The Alienation of Negro Literature
347
The Didactic and the Literary in Four Harlem
357
Walter White and the Harlem Renaissance
371

On Negro Literature
98
Design and Movement in Cane
107
Some Reflections on the Negro Novel
124
The Problems of the Negro Writer
135
American Negro Literature
149
An Essay in Criticism
168
René Maran and the New Negro
182
Of Negroes Old and
198
The Harlem Renaissance and Today
212
Harlem Renaissance
234
The Van Vechten Vogue
252
Race and Revolution in Negro Literature
266
Integration and Race Literature
275
Charles S Johnson
381
Ambivalence and Hope
393
The Writers and Poets
403
Langston Hughes
414
The Essential McKay
428
An Evaluation
447
Lost Generation or Negro Renaissance?
454
The Short Stories of Rudolph Fisher
463
Zora Neale Hurston Novelist and Folklorist
477
Claude McKay and the New Negro of the 1920s
485
A Novel Folklorist
495
Acknowledgments
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1996)

Cary D. Wintz is Professor of History at Texas Southern University in Houston. He received his undergraduate education at Rice University and his Ph.D. from Kansas State University. He is the author of many books, articles, and book reviews, mostly in the field of African American history or immigrant/ethnic history, and he has lectured internationally on these topics as a USIA lecturer in both the Philippines and India.

Bibliographic information