The Preventable causes of disease, injury, and death in American manufactories and workshops, and the best means and appliances for preventing and avoiding them

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Republican Press Assn., 1886 - 19 pages
 

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Page 5 - THE PREVENTABLE CAUSES OF DISEASE, INJURY, AND DEATH IN AMERICAN MANUFACTORIES AND WORKSHOPS, AND THE BEST MEANS AND APPLIANCES FOR PREVENTING AND AVOIDING THEM.
Page 3 - ... and philanthropic citizen whose unpretentious generosity and unselfish devotion to the interests of humanity have given us these essays, but the financial inability of the association renders it impossible to distribute them gratuitously ; — therefore a price covering the cost has been placed upon these publications. It is to be hoped, however, that government departments, state and local boards of health, sanitary and benevolent associations, etc., will either publish these essays, or purchase...
Page 7 - ... down upon the elevator platform. His head by some means came in contact with a timber; he would have been killed had not his cries quickly attracted the attention of one of the foremen, who stopped the elevator. As it was his scalp hung over his face, being held only by a hinge at the forehead. Had he been standing upright, the accident could not have happened. The annual loss of life in attempting to escape from burning factories is appalling, and the subject of fire-escapes demands the most...
Page 8 - Where chemicals are poured down the sinks, use cesspools covers. These are circular pieces of wood covered on the under side with lead and rubber, and having an earthen knob on top. Ventilation should be such that a change of air is effected without drafts upon the head of any person. This may be accomplished by placing the top openings, whether into air shafts or to the outside, well up, and by keeping the inlet openings well down. Some years ago the writer served as a junior member upon a hall...
Page 17 - ... friend of ours upon his own premises. Had one of his men been at the brake, a fatal accident would have been the result. Even with his experience and strength, the car reached the dead end with a force that threw him from the car, leaving him hanging from the brake by his powerful arms. Machinery kept constantly running and under inspection is less liable to break down and cause accidents than where it remains idle a good portion of the time. Where the workmen are of good habits it is better...
Page 19 - Economy of space in some buildings requires that the overhead (ceiling) spaces be used. Where this is done, keep the articles hung up away from over the work-benches as much as possible. Use hooks or pins, the outer ends of which are the highest. This prevents jars sending down the articles hung up. Pack goods on overhanging shelves so they cannot be shaken down. Keep tools, flower-pots, etc., off the window-sills, unless there is a guard to the window. One of our most respected state governors,...
Page 3 - As the result of prizes offered by Mr. Henry Lomb, of Rochester. NY, through the American Public Health Association, the following awards were made at the last meeting of the association : I. HEALTHY HOMES AND FOODS FOR THE WORKING CLASSES.
Page 13 - ... Against the wall, under a protection from the weather, hang a strong ladder, with spikes at the bottom end, a scaling-ladder having hooks at its upper end, and a fire-hook. This hook of iron, with a chain attached, is mounted upon a long, stout pole. A rope is attached to the chain. The inside portable fire apparatus, distributed at accessible points, consists of tubs and pails of water, fire-axes, ropes with hooks attached for drawing up hose, and hand fire-grenades (if they can be made to hold...

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