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Accordingly, there may be a place for some separation of military and civilian space activities. This certainly is implicit in the National Aeronautics and Space Act.

The committee is mindful, however, that the act also called for a maximum of cooperation, coordination, and overall programing. What the committee felt was that the arrangements for the Discoverer launching were quite probably correct in this instance. But the committee is also aware that there remains an undercurrent of uncertainty, and possibly some mutual distrust between elements of the scientific community and persons in the Defense Establishment. This is not something which can be solved overnight, and probably mutual understanding is today at a higher level than it has been in some past years. There must be a continuing effort to recognize genuine security needs which may involve some parallel development and classification of information. There must also be searching examination of plans to separate and to classify to insure that our own work is not hampered, and that information so restricted is truly not available to potential enemies. In some instances, greater freedom of information may pay dividends to our own research efforts even at the price of showing a few shortcuts to our rivals.

CONCLUSION

The committee views this as but the first of a number of reports which will be required to aid the Congress and the public in acquiring a better appreciation of where we stand. We recognize that few individuals will have the opportunity to study in detail the printed record of these hearings, even aside from the problem of making the necessary excisions which have been required in transcripts of executive sessions, thereby limiting the information generally available.

The committee has adopted the practice of submitting its executive transcripts to the agency appearing before it, to insure that the maximum information which can be disclosed with safety is made available. This is important to proper public understanding.

The committee believes that our scientific and technical endeavors, both for defense, and for general human betterment must have a very high priority in our allocation of funds, resources, and manpower. What is done today, often with only partly predictable results, will determine our fate in the years to come.

86TH CONGRESS HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 1st Session

DISPOSITION OF SUNDRY PAPERS

JUNE 18, 1959.-Ordered to be printed

REPORT No. 563

Mr. THOMPSON of New Jersey, from the Joint Committee on Disposi tion of Executive Papers, submitted the following

REPORT

[Pursuant to 63 Stat. 377]

The joint select committee of the Senate and House of Representatives, appointed on the part of the Senate and House of Representatives and acting in compliance with the provisions of the act approved July 7, 1943 (57 Stat. 380), as amended by the act approved July 6, 1945 (59 Stat. 434) and the act approved June 30, 1949 (63 Stat. 377), respectfully reports to the Senate and House of Representatives that it has received and examined the report of the Archivist of the United States No. 59-12, dated June 10, 1959, to the 86th Congress, 1st session, submitting the following lists or schedules covering records proposed for disposal by the Government agencies indicated:

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Your committee reports that the records proposed for disposal in the said lists or schedules reported by the Archivist of the United States do not, or will not after the lapse of the period specified, have sufficient administrative, legal, research, or other value to warrant their continued preservation by the Government and recommends that

their disposal be accomplished subject to the proviso of section 6 and the provisions of section 9 of the aforementioned act, as amended. Respectfully submitted to the Senate and House of Representatives.

FRANK THOMPSON, Jr.,
WILLARD S. CURTIN,

Members on the Part of the House.
OLIN D. JOHNSTON,

FRANK CARLSON,

Members on the Part of the Senate.

86TH CONGRESS HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 1st Session

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REPORT No. 564

APPLICATIONS

PERMITTING THE PROCESSING OF CERTAIN
UNDER THE SMALL TRACTS ACT FOR LANDS INCLUDED IN THE
CARIBOU AND TARGHEE NATIONAL FORESTS BY THE ACT OF
AUGUST 14, 1958

JUNE 19, 1959.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mrs. ProST, from the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H.R. 3682]

The Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H.R. 3682) to permit the processing of certain applications under the Small Tracts Act for lands included in the Caribou and Targhee National Forests by the act of August 14, 1958, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend that the bill, as amended, do pass.

The amendment is as follows:

Page 1, lines 6 to 9, strike out the material in quotation marks and insert in lieu thereof the following:

nor to prejudice the sale or lease by the Secretary of the
Interior under the Act of June 1, 1938 (52 Stat. 609), as
amended, of lands for which applications under that Act were
pending on March 28, 1957, and of one additional tract, not
exceeding five acres, in either the south half of the northwest
quarter of the northeast quarter of the northwest quarter,
or the north half of the northeast quarter of the northwest
quarter of the northwest quarter, both of section 17, town-
ship 2 south, range 46 east, Boise Meridian, if application
for such additional tract be made not later than July 1, 1960,
by an applicant whose application under R.S. 2455, as
amended (43 U.S.C. 1171) for lands within the west half of the
said section 17as pending on March 28, 1957.

Page 2, lines 4 to 6, strike out the words: "under the Act of June 1, 1938, which were pending in the Department of the Interior on March 28, 1957," and insert in lieu thereof the words "identified in the amendment to section 4 of the Act of August 14, 1958, which is made by section 1 of this Act,".

PURPOSE

The purpose of H.R. 3682 is to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to sell or lease, under the Small Tracts Act (52 Stat. 609, 43 U.S.C. 682-682e), as amended, certain lands which were added to the Caribou and Targhee National Forests in the State of Idaho by the act of August 14, 1958 (72 Stat. 607). The lands in question are those for which applications were pending in the Department of the Interior on March 28, 1957, the date on which S. 1748, 85th Congress, which became the act of August 14, 1958, was introduced in the Senate. If H.R. 3682 is enacted, the Secretary will be authorized to grant or reject these applications on the basis of the same standards which he would have applied had the 1958 act not become law.

Enactment of H.R. 3682 will also authorize the Secretary to grant or reject, as under the Small Tracts Act and in accordance with the same standards, an application for one additional small tract if such application is filed not later than July 1, 1960, by the person who had an application pending on March 28, 1957, under the Isolated Tracts Act, as amended (R.S. 2455, 43 U.S.C. 1171) for a larger area identified in the bill.

NEED

Al

At the time the bill which became the 1958 act was introduced in the 85th Congress, there were pending before the Department of the Interior 22 applications for the lease or sale of land under the Small Tracts Act and one application under the Isolated Tracts Act. though section 4(a) of the 1958 act expressly provided that nothing contained in it should be construed "to diminish or in anywise affect any valid rights in or to, or in connection with," the lands which were being covered into the Caribou and Targhee National Forests, no provision was made for preserving the status of the pending applications or for permitting the Secretary of the Interior to decide to accept or reject them on their own merits.

The committee agrees that, even though the small tract applicants had and have no legally protected interest in the lands, they were entitled to more consideration than they were accorded. This can now be given them only by the enactment of legislation which will restore the status quo ante and open the way for the Secretary to determine, without reference to the enactment of the 1958 law, whether the applications should be rejected or whether they should be wholly or partially granted. Enactment of H.R. 3682 is needed to accomplish this object.

The application under the Isolated Tracts Act is somewhat different since it was for 320 acres which, because of the construction by the United States of the Palisades Reservoir in the vicinity, have probably become far more valuable than they were before and might, if allowed to go to one person, result in an unjustifiable windfall. In view of this, the committee's amendment to the bill allows this applicant to reapply under the Small Tracts Act and permits the Secretary to process the application in the same way as the others.

The committee points out that under H.R. 3682 the Secretary_of the Interior is not required to sell or lease the lands in question. He is merely authorized to grant or reject in whole or in part the various applications on the basis of the same standards which would have

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