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86TH CONGRESS HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 1st Session

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REPORT No. 570

ADMISSION OF VETERANS TO LOW RENT HOUSING

JUNE 22, 1959.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. SPENCE, from the Committee on Banking and Currency, submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H.R. 4468]

The Committee on Banking and Currency, to whom was referred the bill (H.R. 4468) to amend the U.S. Housing Act of 1937 to extend the period during which families of veterans and servicemen may be admitted to public housing without regard to the general requirement that they be displacees or previous residents of substandard housing, having considered the same, report favorably thereon without amendment and recommend that the bill do pass.

Section 15(8) (b) of the U.S. Housing Act of 1937, as amended, provides that in order to be admitted to a low-rent housing project assisted under the act, a family must be living in an unsafe, insanitary, or overcrowded dwelling, or must be about to be displaced from their home by certain specified kinds of governmental action. This requirement was written into the law in 1949, but at the same time the families of veterans and servicemen (and of deceased veterans and servicemen) were exempted from the requirement. The original exemption expired in 1954, at which time it was renewed for an additional 5 years, so as to expire March 1, 1959. H.R. 4468 would renew the exemption for another 5 years, until March 1, 1964. This exemption, in combination with section 10(g) of the act, results in granting a preference to veterans' families of low income who seek admission to low-rent housing projects.

The bill has the support of veterans' organizations, and the Administrator of the Housing and Home Finance Agency has indicated that neither the Agency nor the Bureau of the Budget would have any objection to the extension.

CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW

In compliance with clause 3 of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by the bill, as introduced, are shown as follows (existing law proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new matter is printed in italics, existing law in which no change is proposed is shown in roman):

SECTION 15(8) (b) OF THE UNITED STATES HOUSING ACT OF 1937

(8) Every contract made pursuant to this Act for annual contributions for any low-rent housing project initiated after March 1, 1949, shall provide that

(a)

(b) a duly authorized official of the public housing agency involved shall make periodic written statements to the Authority that an investigation has been made of each family admitted to the low-rent housing project involved during the period covered thereby, and that, on the basis of the report of said investigation, he has found that each such family at the time of its admission (i) had a net family income not exceeding the maximum income limits theretofore fixed by the public housing agency (and approved by the Authority) for admission of families of low income to such housing; and (ii) lived in an unsafe, insanitary, or overcrowded dwelling, or was to be displaced by any low-rent housing project or by any public slum-clearance, redevelopment or urban renewal project, or through action of a public body or court, either through the enforcement of housing standards or through the demolition, closing, or improvement of a dwelling unit or units, or actually was without housing, or was about to be without housing as a result of a court order of eviction, due to causes other than the fault of the tenant: Provided, That the requirement in (ii) shall not be applicable in the case of the family of any veteran or serviceman (or of any deceased veteran or serviceman) where application for admission to such housing is made not later than [March 1, 1959] March 1, 1964;

86TH CONGRESS 1st Session

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HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

REPORT No. 571

USE OF SURPLUS GRAINS TO PREVENT WATERFOWL DEPREDATIONS

JUNE 22, 1959.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. SPENCE. from the Committee on Banking and Currency, submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H.R. 7631]

The Committee on Banking and Currency, to whom was referred the bill (H.R. 7631) to amend the act of July 3, 1956 (70 Stat. 492), entitled "An act to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to cooperate with Federal and non-Federal agencies in the prevention of waterfowl depredations, and for other purposes," having considered the same, report favorably thereon without amendment and recommend that the bill do pass.

This bill would repeal the expiration date (July 3, 1959) now contained in Public Law 654 of the 84th Congress. It would thereby make permanent the authorization in Public Law 654 for the Secretary of the Interior to use surplus grains of the Commodity Credit Corporation to feed migratory waterfowl to prevent crop damage. Feeding is done in cooperation with State and local officials as well as private groups, and is accomplished in such a way as to lure waterfowl away from farmers' fields where they are causing crop damage, yet not expose them to shooting.

Total costs of the program since its inception 3 years ago have averaged slightly over $20,000 a year, chiefly to reimburse Commodity Credit Corporation for its investment in the grain. Balanced against this modest cost are substantial savings to the Government in storage costs and far greater savings to farmers in protection against crop damage.

Enactment of the bill was recommended by the administration, as indicated in the attached letter to the Speaker, which was referred to your committee:

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,
Washington, D.C., June 1, 1959.

Hon. SAM RAYBURN,

Speaker of the House of Representatives,
Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. SPEAKER: Enclosed herewith is a draft of a proposed bill, to amend the act of July 3, 1956 (70 Stat. 492), entitled "An act to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to cooperate with Federal and non-Federal agencies in the prevention of waterfowl depredations, and for other purposes.'

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We recommend that the proposed bill be referred to the appropriate committee for consideration, and that it be enacted.

This proposed legislation would repeal section 5 of the act of July 3, 1956, which authorized this Department to cooperate with Federal and non-Federal agencies in the prevention of waterfowl depredations. Section 5 of the act limits operations thereunder to 3 years following enactment. As a result, operations under the act are due to expire on July 3, 1959. We believe that such operations should continue on the same basis now provided in the act. We feel that further changes should not be made in the 1956 act at this time. If future operations demonstrate the need for additional changes, we shall, of course, make recommendations accordingly to the Congress.

The 1956 act provides that, for the purpose of preventing crop damage by migratory waterfowl, the Commodity Credit Corporation shall make available to the Secretary of the Interior such wheat, corn, or other grains, acquired through price support operations as may be certified by the Commodity Credit Corporation to be available for purposes of the act. The Secretary of the Interior is authorized to requisition grain to be used to lure migratory waterfowl away from crop depredations and at the same time not expose such migratory waterfowl to shooting over areas to which the waterfowl has been lured by such feeding programs. In our opinion, the 1956 act has accomplished its purpose during the time that it has been in operation.. Since there is a continuing need for grain to be used in depredation. control work, we urge that the act be continued in effect and that the time limitation imposed by section 5 thereof be repealed. Since enactment of the 1956 act, this Department has requisitioned an average of 400 tons of grain annually. This grain has been used judiciously and in a manner that we feel is in the public interest in preventing and curtailing waterfowl crop damage. Although we have been reluctant to undertake this type of control, we find that under certain conditions waterfowl feeding programs constitute an effective means of preventing or controlling crop depredations caused by birds. Consequently, the use of grain that can be made available for this purpose is desirable when carried out under proper safeguards and consistently with good wildlife management practices.

We have been advised by the Bureau of the Budget that there is no objection to the submission of this proposed legislation to the Congress.

Sincerely yours,

Ross LEFFLER, Assistant Secretary of the Interior.

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