The White Doe of Rylstone, Or, The Fate of the Nortons

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Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, and Roberts, 1859 - 165 pages
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Page 35 - When soft ! — the dusky trees between, And down the path through the open green, Where is no living thing to be seen ; And through yon gateway, where is found, Beneath the arch with ivy bound, Free entrance to the church-yard ground...
Page 159 - Long, long in darkness did she sit, And her first words were, " Let there be In Bolton, on the field of Wharf, A. stately Priory ! " The stately Priory was reared ; And Wharf, as he moved along, To matins joined a mournful voice, Nor failed at even-song. And the Lady prayed in heaviness That looked not for relief ! But slowly did her succour come, And a patience to her grief. Oh ! there is never sorrow of heart That shall lack a timely end, If but to God we turn, and ask Of Him to be our friend.
Page 37 - Comes gliding in with lovely gleam, Comes gliding in serene and slow, Soft and silent as a dream, A solitary Doe ! White she is as lily of June, And beauteous as the silver moon When out of sight the clouds are driven, And she is left alone in heaven ; Or like a ship some gentle day In sunshine sailing far away. A glittering ship, that hath the plain Of ocean for her own domain.
Page 38 - Is through space of open day, Where the enamoured sunny light Brightens her that was so bright ; Now doth a delicate shadow fall, Falls upon her like a breath, Prom some lofty arch or wall, As she passes underneath...
Page 94 - A soft and lulling sound is heard Of streams inaudible by day; The garden pool's dark surface, stirred By the night insects in their play, Breaks into dimples small and bright; A thousand, thousand rings of light That shape themselves and disappear Almost as soon as...
Page 160 - Bolton, on the field of Wharf, A stately Priory ! " The stately Priory was reared ; And Wharf, as he moved along, To matins joined a mournful voice, Nor failed at even-song. And the Lady prayed in heaviness That looked not for relief ! But slowly did her succour come, And a patience to her grief. Oh ! there is never sorrow of heart That shall lack a timely end, If but to God we turn, and ask Of Him to be our friend ! XXII.
Page 38 - Where the enamoured sunny light Brightens her that was so bright; Now doth a delicate shadow fall, Falls upon her like a breath, From some lofty arch or wall, As she passes underneath: Now some gloomy nook partakes Of the glory that she makes, — High-ribbed vault of stone, or cell, With perfect cunning framed as well Of stone, and ivy, and the spread Of the elder's bushy head; Some jealous and forbidding cell, That doth the living stars repel, And where no flower hath leave to dwell.
Page 33 - Along the banks of crystal Wharf, Through the Vale retired and lowly, Trooping to that summons holy. And, up among the moorlands, see What sprinklings of blithe company ! Of lasses and of shepherd grooms, That down the steep hills force their way, Like cattle through the budded brooms ; Path, or no path, what care they...
Page 35 - tis the sunrise now of zeal; Of a pure faith, the vernal prime — In great Eliza's golden time. A moment ends the fervent din, And all is hushed, without and within; For though the priest, more tranquilly, Recites the holy liturgy, The only voice which you can hear Is the river murmuring near.
Page 14 - England, they all consented to it, provided it should prove agreeable to Queen Elizabeth. The Earl of Leicester (Elizabeth's favourite) undertook to break the matter to her, but before he could find an opportunity, the affair had come to her ears by other hands, and she was thrown into a violent flame. The Duke of Norfolk, with several of his friends, was committed to the Tower, and summons were sent to the Northern Earls instantly to make their appearance at Court. It is said that the Earl of Northumberland,...

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