Friendship

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Albert & Scott, 1890 - 104 pages
 

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User Review  - lpierson14 - LibraryThing

An epic story that tests the bonds of friendship in a time of great divide in American history. The story takes places in a small town in Missisppipi in 1933. Four black children are sent to a local ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Lisapier - LibraryThing

An epic story that tests the bonds of friendship in a time of great divide in American history. The story takes places in a small town in Missisppipi in 1933. Four black children are sent to a local ... Read full review

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Page 62 - ... maketh daylight in the understanding, out of darkness and confusion of thoughts: neither is this to be understood only of faithful counsel, which a man receiveth from his friend; but before you come to that, certain it is, that whosoever hath his mind fraught with many thoughts, his wits and understanding do clarify and break up, in the communicating and discoursing with another; he tosseth his thoughts more easily; he marshalleth them more orderly; he seeth how they look when they are turned...
Page 64 - ... for our case; but the best receipt (best I say to work, and best to take,) is the admonition of a friend. It is a strange thing to behold what gross errors and extreme absurdities many (especially of the greater sort,) do commit for want of a friend to tell them of them, to the great damage both of their fame and fortune: for, as St. James saith, they are as men " that look sometimes into a glass, and presently forget their own shape and favour...
Page 63 - So as there is as much difference between the counsel that a friend giveth, and that a man giveth himself, as there is between the counsel of a friend and of a flatterer; for there is no such flatterer as is a man's self, and there is no such remedy against flattery of a man's self as the liberty of a friend.
Page 63 - And certain it is, that the light that a man receiveth by counsel from another, is drier and purer than that which cometh from his own understanding and judgment; which is ever infused and drenched in his affections and customs.
Page 61 - Comineus observeth of his first master, Duke Charles the Hardy, namely, that he would communicate his secrets with none, and, least of all, those secrets which troubled him most. Whereupon he goeth on and saith that towards his latter time that closeness did impair and a little perish his understanding.
Page 66 - Men have their time, and die many times in desire of some things which they principally take to heart ; the bestowing of a child, the finishing of a work, or the like. If a man have a true friend, he may rest almost secure that the care of those things will continue after him ; so that a man hath, as it were, two lives in his desires.
Page 58 - Magna civitas, magna solitudo ; because in a great town friends are scattered ; so that there is not that fellowship, for the most part, which is in less neighbourhoods. But we may go further and affirm most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness...
Page 57 - It had been hard for him that spake it to have put more truth and untruth together in few words than in that speech, " Whosoever is delighted in solitude, is either a wild beast or a god...
Page 79 - I have and what content I can find in conversing with each, if there be one to whom I am not equal. If I have shrunk unequal from one contest, the joy I find in all the rest becomes mean and cowardly.
Page 65 - And, if any man think that he will take counsel, but it shall be by pieces, asking counsel in one business of one man, and in another business of another man, it is well (that is to say better perhaps than if he asked none at all) ; but he runneth two dangers — one, that he shall not be faithfully counselled, for it is a rare thing...

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