The Higher Powers of Mind and Spirit

Front Cover
Dodge publishing Company, 1917 - 241 pages

The Higher Powers of Mind and Spirit is a self help classic by Ralph Waldo Trine. We are all dwellers in two kingdoms, the inner kingdom, the kingdom of the mind and spirit, and the outer kingdom, that of the body and the physical universe about us. In the former, the kingdom of the unseen, lie the silent, subtle forces that are continually determining, and with exact precision, the conditions of the latter.To strike the right balance in life is one of the supreme essentials of all successful living.

 

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Page 115 - Ye call me Master and Lord: and ye say well; for so I am. If I then, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet, ye also ought to wash one another's feet. For I have given you an example, that ye should do as I have done to you.
Page 82 - And when they had fulfilled the days, as they returned, the child Jesus tarried behind in Jerusalem ; and Joseph and his mother knew not of it.
Page 146 - The law and the prophets were until John: since that time the kingdom of God is preached, and every man presseth into it.
Page 158 - Hast thou not known ? hast thou not heard, that the Everlasting God, the LORD, the Creator of the ends of the earth, fainteth not, neither is weary ? there is no searching of His understanding.
Page 99 - Now the Lord is the Spirit: and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty.
Page 158 - He giveth power to the faint; and to them that have no might he increaseth strength. Even the youths shall faint and be weary, and the young men shall utterly fall; but they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint.
Page 94 - And when he came to himself, he said, How many hired servants of my father's have bread enough and to spare, and I perish with hunger! I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee. And am no more worthy to be called thy son: make me as one of thy hired servants.
Page 12 - ... and thine ears shall hear a word behind thee, saying, " This is the way, walk ye in it," when ye turn to the right hand, and when ye turn to the left.
Page 113 - Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye are as graves which appear not, and the men that walk over them are not aware of them.
Page 26 - Binds it, and makes all error : and to KNOW Rather consists in opening out a way Whence the imprisoned splendour may escape, Than in effecting entry for a light Supposed to be without.

About the author (1917)

Ralph Waldo Trine (October 26, 1866 - November 8, 1958) was an American philosopher, author, and teacher. He wrote many books on the New Thought movement. Trine was a close friend of Henry Ford and had several conversations with him about success in life. Born September 9, 1866, [1] in Mount Morris, Illinois, [2] Trine was the son of Samuel G. Trine and Ellen E. Newcomer.[3] He attended public school, and after graduating from high school at the age of 16 he began work as a farmer and lumberjack.[4] Later he worked as a bank teller for a time before going to college. Trine was influenced by writings of Emmet Fox, Johann Gottlieb Fichte, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry Drummond.[3][8] Trine's book What All the World's A-Seeking amplified on ideas and concepts Drummond brought up originally in his book, The Greatest Thing in the World and Other Addresses. Trine's primary work, In Tune with the Infinite was published in 1897.[12] It has been translated into some twenty languages and millions of copies have been sold.[3][13] It was a favorite of Queen Victoria and Janet Gaynor. Henry Ford attributed his automobile business and financial success to ideas he picked up from Trine's book. He gave away copies of Trine's book to executive industrialists he knew. Ford considered Trine an old friend and had several intimate conversations with him about life and success.[3][18][19] He attributed many aspects of his success in life directly to these talks with Trine. Trine was a philosopher and teacher besides being the author of many books related to the New Thought movement.[3] He was introduced to the movement in the late nineteenth-century and was an advocate in the early twentieth-century of the related ideas.[3] He was one of the first of its representatives to write books on it.[3] His writings had an influence on other religious people including Ernest Holmes, a pioneer of Religious Science.[26] Trine's books of the early twentieth-century on New Thought ideas have promoted and sold more than any other of this genre.[7] The basic principles that Trine wrote about were later published by other self-help authors like Napoleon Hill, David Schwartz and Brian Tracy

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