Sunshine in the Soul

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Roberts Brothers, 1887
 

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Page 38 - This is the ship of pearl, which, poets feign, Sails the unshadowed main, — The venturous bark that flings On the sweet summer wind its purpled wings In gulfs enchanted, where the siren sings, And coral reefs lie bare, Where the cold sea-maids rise to sun their streaming hair.
Page 35 - So here hath been dawning Another blue Day : Think wilt thon let it Slip useless away. Out of Eternity This new Day is born ; Into Eternity. At night, will return. Behold it aforetime No eye ever did : So soon it forever From all eyes is hid. Here hath been dawning Another blue Day : Think wilt thou let it Slip useless away.
Page 38 - Year after year beheld the silent toil That spread his lustrous coil; Still, a<s the spiral grew, He left the past year's dwelling for the new, Stole with soft step its shining archway through, Built up its idle door, Stretched in his last-found home, and knew the old no more.
Page 55 - Teach me, my God and King, In all things Thee to see; And what I do in anything, To do it as for Thee.
Page 50 - No more ! I will abroad! What ! shall I ever sigh and pine ? My lines and life are free, free as the road, Loose as the wind, as large as store.
Page 42 - Calm soul of all things ! make it mine To feel, amid the city's jar, That there abides a peace of thine, Man did not make, and cannot mar. The will to neither strive nor cry, The power to feel with others give ! Calm, calm me more! nor let me die Before I have begun to live.
Page 15 - IT is the first mild day of March : Each minute sweeter than before, The redbreast sings from the tall larch That stands beside our door. There is a blessing in the air, Which seems a sense of joy to yield To the bare trees, and mountains bare And grass in the green field.
Page 28 - Love had he found in huts where poor Men lie : His daily Teachers had been Woods and Rills, The silence that is in the starry sky, The sleep that is among the lonely hills.
Page 11 - I fold my hands and wait, *"•' Nor care for wind, or tide, or sea ; I rave no more 'gainst time or fate, For, lo ! my own shall come to me.
Page 18 - To the solid ground Of nature trusts the Mind that builds for aye ; Convinced that there, there only, she can lay Secure foundations.

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