Discourses in America, Issue 1

Front Cover
Macmillan and Company, 1885 - 207 pages
The first discourse was originally given in New York, and afterwards published in the Nineteenth century; the second was given as the Rede lecture at Cambridge, and recast for delivery in America; the third was delivered in Boston.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 121 - For whosoever will save his life shall lose it: but whosoever will lose his life for my sake, the same shall save it. 25 For what is a man advantaged, if he gain the whole world, and lose himself, or be cast away?
Page 155 - THOUGH love repine, and reason chafe, There came a voice without reply, — • " 'Tis man's perdition to be safe, When for the truth he ought to die.
Page 85 - An army without weapons of precision, and with no particular base of operations, might more hopefully enter upon a campaign on the Rhine, than a man, devoid of a knowledge of what physical science has done in the last century, upon a criticism of life.
Page 182 - Where the heart is, there the muses, there the gods sojourn, and not in any geography of fame. Massachusetts, Connecticut River and Boston Bay you think paltry places, and the ear loves names of foreign and classic topography. But here we are; and. if we will tarry a little, we may come to learn that here is best.
Page 2 - Things and actions are what they are, and the consequences of them will be what they will be : Why then should we desire to be deceived?
Page 135 - And for the generality of men there will be found, I say, to arise, when they have duly taken in the proposition that their ancestor was "a hairy quadruped furnished with a tail and pointed ears, probably arboreal in his habits...
Page 123 - ... erroneous conceptions about many important matters, we shall find that this art, and poetry, and eloquence, have in fact not only the power of refreshing and delighting us, they have also the power, — such is the strength and worth, in essentials, of their authors...
Page 183 - The exclusive in fashionable life does not see that he excludes himself from enjoyment, in the attempt to appropriate it. The exclusionist in religion does not see that he shuts the door of heaven on himself, in striving to shut out others.
Page 136 - Greek, so with letters generally : they will some day come, we may hope, to be studied more rationally, but they will not lose their place. What will happen will rather be that there will be crowded into education other matters besides, far too many ; there will be, perhaps, a period of unsettlement and confusion and false tendency ; but letters will not in the end lose their leading place.
Page 155 - So nigh is grandeur to our dust, So near is God to man, When Duty whispers low, Thou must, The youth replies, I can.

Bibliographic information