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and faithfull Seruanc

Andrew Maruellin

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III.

MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS.

I.

For his Excellence, the Lord General Cromwell. these with my most humble service:

May it please your Excellence,

It might perhaps seem fit for me to seek out words to giue your Excellence thanks for my selfe. But indeed the onely Ciuility which it is proper for me to practise with so eminent a Person is to obey you, and to performe honestly the worke that you haue set me about. Therefore I shall use the time that your Lordship is pleas'd to allow me for writing, onely to that purpose for which you haue giuen me it : That is to render you some account of Mr Dutton. I haue taken care 10 to examine him seuerall times in the presence of Mr Oxenbridge, as those who weigh and tell ouer mony before some witnesse ere they take charge of it. For I thought that there might possibly be some lightnesse in the Coyn, or errour in the telling, which hereafter I should be bound to make good. Therefore Mr Oxenbridge is the best to make your Excellence an impartiall relation thereof. I shall onely say that I shall striue according to my best understanding (that is according to those Rules your Lordship hath giuen me) to increase whatsoeuer Talent he may haue already. Truly he is of a gentle and waxen disposition and, God be praisd, I can not say that he hath brought 20 with him any euill Impression, and I shall hope to set nothing upon his Spirit but what may be of a good Sculpture. He hath in him two things which make Youth most easy to be managed, Modesty which is the bridle to Vice, and Emulation which is the Spurr to Virtue. And the Care which your Excellence is pleas'd to take of him is no small incouragement and shall be so represented to him. But aboue all I shall labour to make him sensible of his Duty to God. For then we begin to serue faithfully, when we consider that he is our Master. And in this both he and I ow infinitely to your Lordship, for hauing placed us in so godly a family as that of Mr Oxenbridge 30 whose Doctrine and Example are like a Book and a Map, not onely instructing the Eare but demonstrating to the Ey which way we ought to trauell. And Mrs Oxenbridge hath a great tendernesse ouer him also in all other things. She has lookd so well to him that he hath

10

already much mended his Complexion: And now she is busy in ordring his Chamber, that he may delight to be in it as often as his Studyes require. For the rest, most of this time hitherto hath been spent in acquainting our selves with him and truly he is very chearfull and I hope thinks us to be good company. I shall upon occasion henceforward informe your Excellence of any particularityes in our litle affairs. For so I esteem it to be my Duty. I haue no more at present but to giue thanks to God for your Lordship, and to beg grace of him, that I may approue my selfe

Your Excellencyes most humble and faithfull Servant
Andrew Marvell.

Windsor July 28 1653.

Mr Dutton presents his most humble Seruice to your Excellence.

2.

For my most honoured Freind John Milton Esquire, Secretarye for the forraine affairs.

at his house in Petty France Westminster.

Honoured Sir,

1 I did not satisfie my self in the Account I gave you, of presenting your Book to my Lord, although it seemed to me that I writ to you 20 all which the Messengers speedy Returne the same night from Eaton would permit me. and I perceive that by Reason of that Hast I did not give you satisfaction neither concerning the Delivery of your Letter at the same Time. Be pleased therefore to pardon me, and know, that I tenderd them both together. But my Lord read not the Letter while I was with him, which I attributed to our Despatch, and some other Businesse tending thereto, which I therefore wished ill to, so farr as it hindred an affaire much better and of greater Importance: I mean that of reading your Letter. And to tell you truly mine own Imagination, I thought that He would not open it while I was there, 30 because He might suspect that I delivering it just upon my Departure might have brought in it some second Proposition like to that which you had before made to him by your Letter to my Advantage. However I assure my self that He has since read it, and you, that He did then witnesse all Respect to your person, and as much satisfaction concerning your work as could be expected from so cursory a Review and so sudden an Account as He could then have of it from me. Mr Oxenbridge at his Returne from London will I know give you

thanks for his Book, as I do with all Acknowledgement and Humility for that you have sent me. I shall now studie it even to the getting of it by Heart esteeming it according to my poor Judgement (which yet I wish it were so right in all Things else) as the most compendious Scale, for so much, to the Height of the Roman eloquence. When I consider how equally it turnes and rises with so many figures, it seems to me a Trajans columne in whose winding ascent we see imboss'd the severall Monuments of your learned victoryes. And Salmatius and Morus make up as great a Triumph as That of Decebalus, whom too for ought I know you shall have forced as Trajan the other, to make 10 themselves away out of a just Desperation. I have an affectionate Curiosity to know what becomes of Colonell Overtons businesse. And am exceeding glad to thinke that Mr Skyner is got near you, the Happinesse which I at the same Time congratulate to him and envie. There being none who doth if I may so say more zealously honour you then

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Andre Mervill to Lo: Jan: 11 1657.

The last weeke Mr Secretary commanded mee to give your Ex:ce expectation of an answere to yr former letters by this poste, but my Ld Faulconbridge did undertake to doe it, now I am againe ordered by him to begg y excuse, hee being neither yett soe well confirmed that hee dare venture into businesse, hee hath received yours of the and as soone as hee shall bee in a Condition (though God bee praysed hee is in a Condition neerer to health then sicknesse) hee promiseth at once to answere those wch lye by him, I begg leave to Continue

4.

Pray what say our 86 men of the businesse & of me?
Your most obligd affectionate cosin

Whitehall. Jan. 15. 1658.

Y!

30

Andr: Marvell.

ΤΟ

already much mended his Complexion: And now she is busy in ordring his Chamber, that he may delight to be in it as often as his Studyes require. For the rest, most of this time hitherto hath been spent in acquainting our selves with him and truly he is very chearfull and I hope thinks us to be good company. I shall upon occasion henceforward informe your Excellence of any particularityes in our litle affairs. For so I esteem it to be my Duty. I haue no more at present but to giue thanks to God for your Lordship, and to beg grace of him, that I may approue my selfe

Your Excellencyes most humble and faithfull Servant
Andrew Marvell.

Windsor July 28 1653.

Mr Dutton presents his most humble Seruice to your Excellence.

2.

For my most honoured Freind John Milton Esquire, Secretarye for the forraine affairs.

at his house in Petty France Westminster.

Honoured Sir,

1 I did not satisfie my self in the Account I gave you, of presenting your Book to my Lord, although it seemed to me that I writ to you 20 all which the Messengers speedy Returne the same night from Eaton would permit me. and I perceive that by Reason of that Hast I did not give you satisfaction neither concerning the Delivery of your Letter at the same Time. Be pleased therefore to pardon me, and know, that I tenderd them both together. But my Lord read not the Letter while I was with him, which I attributed to our Despatch, and some other Businesse tending thereto, which I therefore wished ill to, so farr as it hindred an affaire much better and of greater Importance : I mean that of reading your Letter. And to tell you truly mine own Imagination, I thought that He would not open it while I was there, 30 because He might suspect that I delivering it just upon my Departure might have brought in it some second Proposition like to that which you had before made to him by your Letter to my Advantage. However I assure my self that He has since read it, and you, that He did then witnesse all Respect to your person, and as much satisfaction concerning your work as could be expected from so cursory a Review and so sudden an Account as He could then have of it from me. Mr Oxenbridge at his Returne from London will I know give you

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