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perhaps hereby better something yet more solid which is here in agitation toward your further contentment & better government for the future. When this businesse is over to your minds pray faile not to giue a particular account to my Lord Generall & my Lord Bellassis how all succeeded with your thanks in the best manner for the favour and justice they haue done you. For to say the truth my Lord Generall has been back and edge to you in this businesse and really my Lord Bellassis has bin so cordially interessed in your behalfe through this whole businesse that I know not which more to commend his courtesy or his industry, his zeale or his prudence but for every one of them he to can not be enough commended nor can you scarse acknowlege it in words equall to the obligation. You may please to communicate this Letter to the Bench.

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I write this to you desiring that you will communicate it to the 20 bench being the relation of what I haue done in your businesse since your joynt Letter to Mr Recorder & my selfe. Mr Recorder chancing to be indisposed in his health I haue advised nevertheless with him and done as much as I could without the benefit of so necessary assistance. I waited yesterday upon my L: Generall Sr Jeremy Smith being pleased as he is never wanting where he may serve you, to goe along with me & Mr Stockdale. I first presented your usuall fee wch the Generall accepted but saying that it was unnecessary and that you might haue bin pleased to spare it and he should be so much more at liberty to show how voluntary & affectionate he was toward 30 your Corporation. I returned the civillest words that I could coyne at the present & renderd him your humble thanks for his continuall patronage of you & the late experiment thereof in the businesse of Wise & told him that you had further sent him up a small tribute of your Hull liquor. He thankd you again for all those things wch you might he said haue spared and added that if the greatest of your military officers should demeane himselfe ill towards you he would take a course with him. Further he said that he believd there would be enough against him. Whom he meant you may thinke I did not ask him neither will it be fit for you to take notice beyond your selues of 40 these things wch he fauord me with in the confidence & familiarity

of discourse. I then enterd into the whole businesse of Wise who he saith hath not yet bin with him nor dares not. He said he had deferrd to answer your letter till he had done it in effect. And bent his discourse so as to assure you that he should be removed out of that Company & trouble you no more. Wch truly considering that he is the Generalls own Cosin & that the Generall himselfe quitted his employment heretofore in Holland rather then make such a submission & that the officer belongs to the D: of Yorke & is now here in town & that there were some defects in the formalityes of 10 the complaint on your part, is I hope honourable enough for you & exemplary against all others that shall offend in the like nature. Nor is it nothing that such an order as formerly was made though it should chance not to be executed. As for my Lord Bellassis whom I spoke with also yesterday he is wholy disposed to do you & himselfe right taking himselfe now more concernd since Wises escape & neglect not hauing yet been with him & offended both at my partner for wch I am sory & at Lt Col: Cartwright neither of them hauing yet giuen him any account at all of his dispatches about that businesse And I perceiue he doth really resent it. But I find that according to 20 the prudence with which men must always handle a mixt businesse he also inclines to that way of removeing the stumbling block And I hope Sir that you will incline the bench to consider whether I am able or whether it be fit for me to urge it beyond that point. Yet it is not all his Parlt men & relations that haue wrought me in the lest but what I simply conceiue as the state of things now is to be possible and satisfactory. What would you haue more of a soldier then to run away and haue him cashiered as to any command in your garrison. The first he hath done & the second he must submit to. And I assure you whatsoever he was among you he is here a kind 30 of decrepit yong gentleman & terribly crest-faln. When the businesse is ended as it will be very shortly I shall giue you account and then it will be time for you to write to my L: Generall & L: Bellassis, if they do not prevent you. For I assure you they use all the civility imaginable to you & as we sat there drinking a cup of sack with the Generall Coll: Legg chancing to be present there were twenty good things said on all hands tending to the good fame reputation & advantage of the Town: an occasion that I was heartily glad of. But this is enough for one Post.

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Your

very

London. Nov: 28. 1668.

I am Sir, affectionate Cosin to serve you, Andr: Marvell

95.

To Mayor Duncalfe.

Gentlemen, my very worthy friends,

I thinke it is fit to giue you this word that yesterday we met and were by Commission under his Majestyes broad seale prorogued till the 19th of October. This further his Majesty declares on all occasions that he is resolued not to part with this Parlament. Alsoe my Lord Keeper declar'd openly at his house at the sealing of the Commission and gaue those present leaue to report it, that whereas there was a rumor of a new parliament, his Mty to his knowledge was resolued to continue this, and that if any necessity of calling a Parlt before 10 that time, his Mty knew an expedient notwithstanding this prorogation to call us again together for his service. This is all I had to say but that I am

Gentlemen &c:

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I received yours of the 13th with a Letter inclosed to Mr Recorder 20 and my selfe upon an overture as you intimate from Mr Skyner touching the businesse of Cary and South But I haue not yet broke ope the Letter, intending to day to meet Mr Recorder and then we shall consider of it. I hope you haue mention'd in that letter something neare the matter what you thinke will be reasonable and satisfactory from the Gentlemen both as to mony and as to civility For something 'tis fit they should pay and that some kind of acknowledgement they should make to the Bench of their misdemeanor. And if herein you haue giuen us a rule to walke by our discretion will be more at ease However I shall strive to manage my part of the businesse so as I 30 shall judge to be most acceptable to you and most honourable.

I am Sir

Your most affectionate Cosin

London. Mar: 16th, 1668

Andr: Marvell.

I am going when I haue writ this toward Hatton garden where I intend to see Sam: The Generall seems somt[hing] better but I much doubt him.

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97.

To Mayor Duncalfe.

Gentlemen my very worthy friends,

Apr: 15. 1669.

I suppose you may haue expected ere this some account from me about the businesse of Mr South and Sr R: Cary which was by you upon Mr Skyners mediation referrd to Mr Recorder and myselfe. But I reckond that MrSkyners letter to you, wherein he signify'd afterwards that they had not matured their proposalls before his necessary departure for Ireland, would put you upon other Counsells. And 10 Mr Recorders Journy for the North falling in presently after I conceiv'd my selfe at a period of that power which you intrusted betwixt us. Neverthelesse lest you should depend still upon any thing relating to your former order and so slip the time convenient either for agreeing or prosecuting that businesse, I thinke fit to giue you hereby notice that, as whatever application should haue been made particularly to me, I would haue referred back to your selues so I haue not since Mr Skyners going had any such proposall from their friends here as might give me a reasonable ground of reporting it to you. So that I thinke you will do very well to treat with any agents that they may 20 employ to you, taking care that it may be so speedily as they may not haue drilld you on beyond the time of prosecution and so safely that no advantage may be taken of your proceedings hitherto when you shall thinke fit to supersede them. But as to the composition you will demand of them I thinke that the lest matter of all, seeing it is before you who are the most competent judges of your own reparation. Wch I am glad is so faln out, not that I would at any time balke either your good opinion or mine own labor but because I am sure the businesse will so be better & more decently ended.

I am your most affectionate servant,

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98.

Andr: Marvell.

To Mayor Duncalfe.

Gentlemen my very worthy friends,

Since mine to you last post Sr R: Cary desired Mr Stockdale to appoint a meeting with me which was yesternight. And then he offerd to referre the businesse to my composure. I told him I had no power left all that I could do was to heare any proposall he would make and

represent it to you. He acknowledgd it to be so after I had told him how the case stood but neverthelesse desir'd therefore I would meet him again to day for then he would propose to me and desird onely that I would acquaint you with it. So I met, there were present also on our part Mr Stockdale & Mr Aston, On his one or two of his friends. I said that as farre as I perceiud from you, you expected something for the persons injurd, something for the poore and all the charges you had been at. They proportioning each head offerd ten pounds upon each that is in the whole thirty pounds to be payd here within a week that you should signify your satisfaction therein 10 Further Sr R: Cary said he would write this night a civill Letter to you in excuse & desire that you would admit this accommodation. Thus the thing is before you. If you impow'r me or any other to make an end upon these termes, it will be effected. If you expect more the whole forfeiture being as I understand 40011 the law is open to you or you may demand an higher composition. Neither as I perceiue are you so straitned in time but that you haue leisure either way without detriment. Therefore I submit the businesse to your better judgement, onely desiring that I may haue some kind of answer to return them by the first opportunity, & remain

Gentlemen &c:

Your most affectionate friend to serve you,

London Apr: 17. 1669.

Andr: Marvell

All the variation in this businesse is to be ascribd to the distance betwixt Mr South & Sr Robert. Your law charges here amount not to 51i.

99.

To Mayor Duncalfe.

Gentlemen, my very worthy friends,

20

This is onely to giue you a short notice that at our meeting this 30 afternoon with Sr Robert Cary and his friends, they received very gladly the news of your concurring with their proposall It falls fittest for them to pay you the mony at Hull. Therefore accordingly at or before Friday come se'night I doubt not but Mr Brown or some other as much to the purpose will wait upon you & pay you the mony, receiuing from you & the other persons concerned authentick releases. And for all further charges here Mr Aston in my presence and the rest of our side hath agreed with them to take of all proceedings with indemnity both to you & them at their expense. Which I will see

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