Page images
PDF
EPUB

LESSON XLIII.

NEW WORDS.

[ocr errors]

Něll
hops
dove
€lose
Pol'lý

write words let'ter
strūts (wards) proudly
wěath'er
pēa'evek
Grănd'mä

[graphic]

NELL'S LETTER.

Dear Grandma, I will try to write

A very little letter,
If I don't spell the words all right,

Why, next time I'll do better.

My little rabbit is alive,

And likes his milk and clover; He likes to see me very much,

But is afraid of Rover.

I have a dove, as white. as snow,

I call her “Polly Feather”; She flies and hops about the yard,

In every kind of weather.

The hens are picking off the grass,

And singing very loudly; While our old peacock struts about,

And shows his feathers proudly.

I think I'll close my letter now,

I've nothing more to tell ; Please answer soon, and come to see

Your loving little Nell.

LANGUAGE LESSON.

Let pupils copy the first stanza of this poem, or write a

letter to their teacher, telling what pets they have.

LESSON XLIV.

worth
(wûrth)
grēen

NEW WORDS.

€är' pět tă€ķs dól’larş doubt

dünça bright twělve

[graphic]
[ocr errors]

missed (mist)

My Aunt Mary had a parrot, whose name was “Polly.”

All the parrots I ever knew were called “Polly.”

Polly was a very pretty bird. She had bright feathers of red, green, and blue.

She did not like to get into the water and wash, so my aunt had to wash her.

Sometimes this made Polly cross, and it was very funny to hear her scold Aunt Mary.

After she had been washed, she would begin to lay her feathers.

If a feather fell out, she would pick it up with her beak and try to put it on her head or back.

She seemed to feel sad because she had lost a feather.

Polly learned to say many words, such as “Good-by, sir," Good morning, sir,” and “Polly wants something to eat.”

[ocr errors]

66

[ocr errors]

Uncle John had a way of saying, “There's no doubt about it;” and soon Polly learned that, too.

One time Aunt Mary was sick, and Polly missed her very much.

Polly got out of her cage and went into every room.

When she came to Aunt Mary's room, she climbed up on the bed.

Aunt Mary said, “Polly, I'm glad to see you.

I'm very sick.” There's no doubt about it!" said Polly

Polly was very playful, but she did many naughty things that Uncle John did not like.

She would walk about the room, and pick the tacks out of the carpet, and bite pieces out of the chairs and table.

At last Uncle John sent for a man to come and buy Polly.

66

.

« PreviousContinue »