Pebbles, Pearls and Gems of the Orient

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G. H. Ellis, 1882 - 238 pages
 

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Page 199 - Yet Ah, that Spring should vanish with the Rose ! That Youth's sweet-scented manuscript should close! The Nightingale that in the branches sang, Ah whence, and whither flown again, who knows!
Page 200 - Oh threats of Hell and Hopes of Paradise! One thing at least is certain — This Life flies; One thing is certain and the rest is Lies : The Flower that once has blown for ever dies.
Page 199 - There was the Door to which I found no Key; There was the Veil through which I could not see: Some little talk awhile of Me and Thee There was — and then no more of Thee and Me.
Page 113 - Learn from yon orient shell to love thy foe, And store with pearls the hand that brings thee woe : Free, like yon rock, from base vindictive pride, Emblaze with gems the wrist that rends thy side : Mark where yon tree rewards the stony shower With fruit nectareous, or the balmy flower : All Nature calls aloud — " Shall man do less Than heal the smiter, and the railer bless ?
Page 199 - The Worldly Hope men set their Hearts upon Turns Ashes — or it prospers; and anon, Like Snow upon the Desert's dusty Face, Lighting a little hour or two — is gone.
Page 200 - I sent my Soul through the Invisible, Some letter of that After-life to spell: And by and by my Soul returned to me, And answered "I Myself am Heaven and Hell...
Page 185 - Where one sees nothing else, hears nothing else, understands nothing else, that is the Infinite. Where one sees something else, hears something else, understands something else, that is the finite. The Infinite is immortal, the finite is mortal.
Page 199 - Ah, my Beloved, fill the Cup that clears To-day of past Regrets and future Fears: To-morrow! — Why, To-morrow I may be Myself with Yesterday's Sev'n thousand Years.
Page 99 - Shine for us with thy best rays, thou bright Dawn, thou who lengthenest our life, thou the love of all, who givest us food, who givest us wealth in cows, horses, and chariots. Thou, daughter of the sky, thou, high born Dawn, whom the Vasishthas magnify with songs, give us riches high and wide...
Page 193 - On parent knees, a naked new-born child Weeping thou sat'st while all around thee smiled ; So live, that sinking in thy last long sleep, Calm thou mayst smile, while all around thee weep.

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