The Works of John Ruskin, Volume 11

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G. Allen, 1904
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Page 114 - Therefore hear now this, thou that art given to pleasures, that dwellest carelessly, that sayest in thine heart, " I am, and none else beside me ; I shall not sit as a widow, neither shall I know the loss of children...
Page 263 - I hold it for indisputable, that the first duty of a State is to see that every child born therein shall be well housed, clothed, fed, and educated, till it attain years of discretion. But in order to the effecting this the Government must have an authority over the people of which we now do not so much as dream.
Page 227 - ... plagiarists of its architects, slaves of its workmen, and Sybarites of its inhabitants ; an architecture in which intellect is idle, invention impossible, but in which all luxury is gratified, and all insolence fortified...
Page 49 - Their line is gone out through all the earth, And their words to the end of the world. In them hath he set a tabernacle for the sun...
Page 364 - I will show you soon A better station' — so, o'er the lagune We glided, and from that funereal bark I leaned, and saw the city, and could mark How from their many isles in evening's gleam Its temples and its palaces did seem Like fabrics of enchantment piled to Heaven. I was about to speak, when — 'We are even 'Now at the point I meant' said Maddalo And bade the gondolieri cease to row.
Page 66 - They look back to the days of childhood as of greatest happiness, because those were the days of greatest wonder, greatest simplicity, and most vigorous imagination. And the whole difference between a man of genius and other men, it has been said a thousand times, and most truly, is that the first remains in great part a child,1 seeing with the large eyes of children, in perpetual wonder, not conscious of much knowledge, — conscious, rather, of infinite ignorance, and yet infinite power ; a fountain...
Page 201 - All art is great, and good, and true, only so far as it is distinctively the work of manhood in its entire and highest sense ; that is to say, not the work of limbs and fingers, but of the soul...
Page 19 - This, then, the reader must always keep in mind when he is examining for himself any examples of cinquecento work. When it has been done by a truly great man, whose life and strength could not be oppressed, and who turned to good account the whole science of his day, nothing is more exquisite. I do not believe, for instance, that there is a more glorious work of sculpture existing in the world...
Page 244 - A city of marble, did I say? nay, rather a golden city, paved with emerald. For truly, every pinnacle and turret glanced or glowed, overlaid with gold, or bossed with jasper. Beneath, the unsullied sea drew in deep breathing, to and fro, its eddies of green wave. Deephearted, majestic, terrible as the sea, — the men of Venice moved in sway of power and war; pure...
Page 53 - Society always has a destructive influence upon an artist : first by its sympathy with his meanest powers ; secondly, by its chilling want of understanding of his greatest ; and, thirdly, by its vain occupation of his time and thoughts.

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