Harriet Martineau's Autobiography ...

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J. R. Osgood, 1877
 

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Page 305 - When I was yet a child, no childish play To me was pleasing ; all my mind was set Serious to learn and know, and thence to do What might be public good; myself I thought Born to that end, born to promote all truth, All righteous things...
Page 561 - Build thee more stately mansions, O my soul, As the swift seasons roll! Leave thy low-vaulted past! Let each new temple, nobler than the last, Shut thee from heaven with a dome more vast, Till thou at length art free, Leaving thine outgrown shell by life's unresting sea!
Page 268 - On this subject I do not wish to think, or speak, or write with moderation. No ! No ! Tell a man whose house is on fire to give a moderate alarm ; tell him to moderately rescue his wife from the hands of...
Page 534 - THE LADIES' NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE REPEAL OF THE CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ACTS.
Page 499 - It is good, in discourse and speech of conversation, to vary and intermingle speech of the present occasion with arguments, tales with reasons, asking of questions with telling of opinions, and jest with earnest: for it is a dull thing to tire, and, as we say now, to jade, any thing too far.
Page 377 - No cruel guard of diligent cares, that keep Crown'd woes awake, as things too wise for sleep : But reverent discipline, and religious fear, And soft obedience, find sweet biding here ; Silence, and sacred rest ; peace, and pure joys...
Page 272 - For lo, they lie in wait for my soul : the mighty are gathered against me; not for my transgression, nor for my sin, O LORD.
Page 402 - I am at Miss Martineau's for a week. Her house is very pleasant, both within and without ; arranged at all points with admirable neatness and comfort. Her visitors enjoy the most perfect liberty ; what she claims for herself she allows them. I rise at my own hour, breakfast alone (she is up at five, takes a cold bath, and a walk by starlight, and has finished breakfast and got to her work by seven o'clock).
Page 112 - How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns.
Page 443 - Of his resolved pow'rs; nor all the wind Of vanity or malice pierce to wrong His settled peace, or to disturb the same : • What a fair seat hath he, from whence he may The boundless wastes and wilds of man survey...

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