Essays and English Traits

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P. F. Collier & son, 1909 - 493 pages
 

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Page 45 - I will go to prison, if need be; but your miscellaneous popular charities ; the education at college of fools ; the building of meeting-houses to the vain end to which many now stand ; alms to sots, and the thousandfold relief societies ; — though I confess with shame I sometimes succumb and give the dollar, it is a wicked dollar which by and by I shall have the manhood to withhold.
Page 50 - Caesar is born, and for ages after we have a Roman Empire. Christ is born, and millions of minds so grow and cleave to his genius that he is confounded with virtue and the possible of man. An institution is the lengthened shadow of one man; as, Monachism, of the Hermit Antony; the Reformation of Luther; Quakerism of Fox; Methodism of Wesley; Abolition of Clarkson. Scipio, Milton called "the height of Rome"; and all history resolves itself very easily into the biography of a few stout and earnest...
Page 140 - In nature every moment is new; the past is always swallowed and forgotten; the coming only is sacred. Nothing is secure but life, transition, the energizing spirit. No love can be bound by oath or covenant to secure it against a higher love. No truth so sublime but it may be trivial tomorrow in the light of new thoughts.
Page 92 - I ought to be equal to every relation. It makes no difference how many friends I have and what content I can find in conversing with each, if there be one to whom I am not equal. If I have shrunk unequal from one contest, insurr.lv the joy I find in all the rest becomes mean and cowardly.
Page 46 - It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion ; it is easy in solitude to live after your own ; but the great man is he who, in the midst of the crowd, keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude.
Page 132 - The key to every man is his thought. Sturdy and defying though he look, he has a helm which he obeys, which is the idea after which all his facts are classified. He can only be reformed by showing him a new idea which commands his own.
Page 122 - A certain tendency to insanity has always attended the opening of the religious sense in men, as if they had been "blasted with excess of light.
Page 230 - To educate the wise man, the State exists; and with the appearance of the wise man, the State expires. The appearance of character makes the State unnecessary. The wise man is the State.
Page 161 - Our log-rolling, our stumps and their politics, our fisheries, our Negroes, and Indians, our boats, and our repudiations, the wrath of rogues, and the pusillanimity of honest men, the northern trade, the southern planting, the western clearing, Oregon and Texas, are yet unsung. Yet America is a poem in our eyes ; its ample geography dazzles the imagination, and it will not wait long for metres.
Page 41 - To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men — that is genius.

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