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" What I must do is all that concerns me, not what the people think. This rule, equally arduous in actual and in intellectual life, may serve for the whole distinction between greatness and meanness. "
Twelve Essays - Page 45
by Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1849 - 261 pages
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Select Essays and Poems

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1808 - 120 pages
...consent to pay for a privilege where I have intrinsic right. Few and mean as my gifts may be, I actually am, and do not need for my own assurance or the assurance of my fellows any secondary testimony. 8, From what motives might a boy be liberal without being at heart Ri'nerous ? Is such liberality of...
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Essays

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1841 - 371 pages
...consent to pay for a privilege where I have intrinsic right. Few and mean as my gifts may be, I actually am, and do not need for my own assurance or the assurance...whole distinction between greatness and meanness. It_is the harder, because ypu will always find those who think they know what is your duty better than...
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Essays, orations and lectures

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1848 - 385 pages
...consent to pay for a privilege where I have intrinsic right. Few and mean as my gifts may be, I actually am, and do not need for my own assurance or the assurance of my fellows any secondary testimony. The objection to conforming to usages that have become dead to you, is that it scatters your force....
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Twelve Essays

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1849 - 261 pages
...consent to pay for a privilege where I have intrinsic right. Few and mean as my gifts may be, I actuallly am, and do not need for my own assurance or the assurance...intellectual life, may serve for the whole distinction hetween greatness and meanness. It is the harder, because you will always find those who think they...
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Essays: First Series

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1856 - 333 pages
...consent to pay for a privilege where I havt intrinsic right. Few and mean as my gifts may be, I actually am, and do not need for my own assurance or the assurance...testimony. What I must do is all that concerns me, not whai the people think. This rule, equally arduous in actual and in intellectual life, may serve for...
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Essays: First Series

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1852 - 333 pages
...consent to pay for a privilege where I hav& intrinsic right. Few and mean as my gifts may be, I actually am, and do not need for my own assurance or the assurance...people think. This rule, equally arduous in actual ; I r v. and-in intellectual life, may serve for the whole distinction between greatness and meanness....
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The National Magazine, Volume 12

Abel Stevens, James Floy - 1858
...thus explains it: What I must do Is all that concerns me, and not what the people think. This rale, equally arduous In actual and in intellectual life,...distinction between greatness and meanness. It is tbe harder, because you will always find those who think they know what is your duty better than you...
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The National Magazine, Volume 12

Abel Stevens, James Floy - 1858
...marks the boundary between them. Emerson thus explains it: What I mnet do is all that concerns me, and not what the people think. This rule, equally arduous...In actual and In Intellectual life, may serve for tbe whole distinction between greatness and meanness. It Is the harder, because you will always find...
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Leaves from an Invalid's Journal, and Poems

Mrs. E. N. Gladding - 1858 - 235 pages
...they, and I will not turn back, though difficulties and disappointments spring up all around me. " What I must do, is all that concerns me, — not what the people think/' says Emerson ; and I send forth my leaves culled, almost at random, from the thick foliage, (not of...
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Morning clouds [by A.J. Penny].

Anne Judith Penny - 1858
...the most obscure hiding-places of truth. " This rule," he continues, " equally arduous in actual and intellectual life, may serve for the whole distinction between greatness and meanness." Now I do not think that a woman ought to be indifferent to the opinion others have of her ; it is so...
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