Psychoanalysis as Biological Science: A Comprehensive Theory

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JHU Press, 2005 - 189 pages
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Psychoanalysis was once considered primarily a humanistic enterprise. The psychoanalyst was a philosopher and an artist, adept at deciphering the communications and intrapsychic behaviors of the unique individual. He or she could rely on intuition alone to obtain good results. In this provocative study, John E. Gedo asserts that biological information is essential to successful and comprehensive psychoanalysis.

Gedo presents his case in three sections. The first is devoted to the controversies surrounding psychoanalysis as a discipline. Beginning with an overview of Freud's enduring contributions to the field, Gedo discusses the importance of both mental contents and reliable, measurable psychobiological data—suggesting that hermeneutics alone cannot yield valid hypotheses. Part 2 addresses each of the major topics of a comprehensive theory of mind, focusing on the accessibility of biological information. This information, he believes, makes an educated exploration of principal questions about behavioral regulation a viable enterprise. The final section integrates these theories into a comprehensive biological hypothesis about behavior and psychoanalytic treatment.

Providing psychoanalysis with a tenable scientific framework, Psychoanalysis as Biological Science should be read by all professionals and students in psychoanalysis, psychiatry, and psychology.

 

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Contents

Hermeneutics and Biology in the Psychoanalytic Situation
15
Alternatives to Freuds Biological Theory
26
The Psychoanalytic Import of Mental Contents
36
Personality Development and Psychopathology
49
A Hierarchy of Motivations as Selforganization
61
Disruption of Selforganization
72
Breakdowns in Information Processing
80
Affectivity
90
Disorders of Thought
115
Object Relations
123
Permutations of Sexuality
131
The Regulation of Behavior
141
Learning and Adaptation
150
The Psychoanalytic Process
158
Unsolved Problems
165
Notes
171

Dreams and Dreaming
98
The Biopsychology of Early Experience
107

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Popular passages

Page 176 - Dorpat, T., & Miller, M. (1992). Clinical Interaction and the Analysis of Meaning. Hillsdale, NJ: Analytic Press.
Page 176 - Fairbairn, W. 1954. An Object Relations Theory of Personality. New York: Basic Books. Ferenczi, S.

About the author (2005)

John E. Gedo, M.D., now retired, was training and supervising analyst at the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis and clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of Illinois School of Medicine.

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