Proceedings of the Liverpool Literary & Philosophical Society, Volume 40

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Page 126 - They shall run like mighty men ; they shall climb the wall like men of war ; and they shall march every one on his ways, and they shall not break their ranks...
Page 142 - Like the noise of chariots on the tops of mountains shall they leap, like the noise of a flame of fire that devoureth the stubble, as a strong people set in battle array.
Page 171 - That in all that territory ceded by France to the United States, under the name of Louisiana, which lies north of thirty-six degrees and thirty minutes north latitude, not included within the limits of the state, contemplated by this act, slavery and involuntary servitude, otherwise than in the punishment of crimes, whereof the parties shall have been duly convicted, shall be,. and is hereby, forever prohibited...
Page 74 - The induction which proceeds by simple enumeration is puerile, leads to uncertain conclusions, and is exposed to danger from one contradictory instance, deciding generally from too small a number of facts, and those only the most obvious. But a really useful induction for the discovery and demonstration of the arts and sciences should separate nature by proper rejections and exclusions, and then conclude for the affirmative after collecting a sufficient number of negatives.
Page 141 - A fire devoureth before them; and behind them a flame burneth: the land is as the garden of Eden before them, and behind them a desolate wilderness; yea, and nothing shall escape them.
Page 170 - The master made a great pet of John ; brought him to table with his first company and friends ; called their attention to every little smart thing he said or did, and to the fact of his being more than a hundred miles from home with a company of cattle alone. While the negro boy (who was fully if not more than his equal...
Page 180 - are the basis of my plan. God has given the strength of the hills to freedom ; they were placed here for the emancipation of the negro race...
Page 170 - ... to the fact of his being more than a hundred miles from home with a company of cattle alone; while the negro boy, who was fully if not more than his equal, was badly clothed, poorly fed...
Page 65 - BEWARE WHEN THE GREAT GOD lets loose a thinker on this planet.
Page 74 - ... those only the most obvious. But a really useful induction for the discovery and demonstration of the arts and sciences, should separate nature by proper rejections and exclusions, and then conclude for the affirmative, after collecting a sufficient number of negatives. Now this has not been done, nor even attempted, except perhaps by Plato, who certainly uses this form of induction in some measure, to sift definitions and ideas.

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