Art and Representation: Contributions to Contemporary Aesthetics

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Ananta Charana Sukla
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001 - 282 pages
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Concentrating on scholarship over the past four decades, this multidisciplinary approach to representation considers conceptual issues about representation and applies different theories to various arts. Following an introduction that traces the historical debates surrounding the concept of representation, Part One focuses on representation and language, epistemology, politics and history, sacrificial rites, possible world and postmodernism. Part Two applies current theories to painting, photography, literature, music, dance, and film. Writings highlight the vital role representation plays in the formation and appreciation of major genres of art.

This work will appeal to art philosophy and aesthetics scholars and to cultural studies and linguistic scholars. Rather than advocate certain theories, the essays illustrate the inherent complexities of representation.

 

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Contents

Representation in Language
29
Representation and Epistemology
59
Political and Historical Representation
69
Representation in Sacrificial Rites
90
Possible World and Representation
101
Postmodernism and Representation
113
PART TWO AESTHETICS AND Arts
135
T R Quigley
148
Painting Photography and Representation
163
Musical Representation
194
Film and Representation
210
Representation Representativeness
243
Selected Bibliography
263
About the Editor and Contributors
281
Copyright

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Page 5 - A sign, or representamen, is something which stands to somebody for something in some respect or capacity. It addresses somebody, that is, creates in the mind of that person an equivalent sign, or perhaps a more developed sign. That sign which it creates I call the interpretant of the first sign.
Page 5 - The linguistic sign unites, not a thing and a name, but a concept and a sound-image.1 The latter is not the material sound, a purely physical thing, but the psychological imprint of the sound, the impression that it makes on our senses. The sound-image is sensory, and if I happen to call it "material...

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About the author (2001)

ANANTA CH. SUKLA is Professor of English at Sambalpur University. He is founding editor of the Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics and founding secretary of Vishwanatha Kaviraja Institute of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics. His publications include The Concept of Imitation in Greek and Indian Aesthetics, Contemporary Indian Aesthetics and numerous other articles on aspects of comparative literature and theory in journals and anthologies.

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