The German Conspiracy in American Education

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George H. Doran Company, 1919
 

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Page 69 - ... curriculum of our elementary school partakes of a purely negative character. But, albeit negative, it is precisely this argument which may eventually prove the rock of wreckage for an undeniably worthy cause. Condensed into a question it reads : Where get the needful number of efficient language-teachers ? I, for my part, acknowledge that I should not exactly relish being charged with the task of manning or womaning (venia sit verbo) all our many public schools with thoroughly competent language-teachers....
Page 84 - A professor, it is said, wishing to curry favor with his royal pupil, informed him overnight of the chapter in Greek that was to be made the subject of the next day's lesson. The young prince did what many boys would not have done. As soon as the classroom was opened on the following morning, he entered and wrote conspicuously on the blackboard the information that had been given him. One may say unhesitatingly that a boy capable of such an action has the root of a fine character in him, possesses...
Page 36 - For the roots of the present lie deep in the past, and nothing in the past is dead to the man who would learn how the present comes to be what it is.
Page 13 - The elbow to elbow fight no longer exists, and the soldier can no longer do his full duty if he simply possesses a sentiment of solidarity powerful enough to unite him to the other combatants, a sentiment that used to be reassuring in the hour of danger. Collective education given by society is the only means which will assure to the army the cohesion necessary to march to victory. The task must be assumed by the mass of the people— in the home, the school, the workshop. The spirit of duty and...
Page 107 - ... independent states, they had full power to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and do all other acts and things which independent states might of right do; and for the support of that declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, did mutually pledge to each other their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honour.
Page 106 - He, who would bring home the wealth of the Indies, must carry the wealth of the Indies with him.' So it is in travelling; a man must carry knowledge with him, if he would bring home knowledge.
Page 76 - ... in his first year in school learns that he may be president some day — where parents permit their children to look down upon their modest callings, where the higher professions are overcrowded, manual labor despised, the farms deserted, we often find in the serving class a weak, discontented class of people. In sharp contrast to them were the people who served us in Germany. They knew what they had to do and did it without feeling that it injured their dignity.
Page 38 - Call" just issued — will be to bring together the representatives from all the students of the world, in order that the spirit of international brotherhood and humanity may be fostered among them as a result of the deliberations of the congress, and in order that the students of the world may be united into an all-embracing world organization.
Page 84 - Kaiser spent three years of his boyhood, a diligent but not a brilliant pupil, ranking tenth among seventeen candidates for the university. Many tales are told of this period of his life, and one of them, at least is illuminating. A professor, it is said, wishing to curry favor with his royal pupil, informed him overnight of the chapter in Greek that was to be made the subject of the next day's lesson. The young prince did what many boys would not have done. As soon as the classroom was opened on...
Page 56 - Only through the preservation of the German language can our race in this land be preserved from entire disappearance. The principal aim should be the founding of independent parochial schools in which . the language of instruction would be German, with English as the foreign language...

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