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" ... the most grateful burgundy. The works of a person that builds, begin immediately to decay ; while those of him who plants begin directly to improve. In this, planting promises a more lasting pleasure than building ; which, were it to remain in equal... "
the farmers magazine - Page 399
1823
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Essays on Men and Manners, Volume 39

William Shenstone - 1804 - 204 pages
...pleasure, than building ; which, were it to remain in equal perfection, would at best begin to moulder and want repairs in imagination. Now trees have a circumstance...dilapidation, serve to wean us from our attachment to them. It is a custom in some countries to condemn the characters of those (after death) that have neither...
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Essays on Men and Manners

William Shenstone - 1804 - 204 pages
...pleasure, than building ; which, were it to remain in equal perfection, would at best begin to moulder and want repairs in imagination. Now trees have a circumstance...dilapidation, serve to wean us from our attachment to them. It is a custom in some countries to condemn the characters of those (after death) that have neither...
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Essays on Men and Manners

William Shenstone - 1804 - 267 pages
...pleasure, than building ; which, were it to remain in equal perfection, would at best begin to moulder and want repairs in imagination. Now trees have a circumstance...dilapidation, serve to wean us from our attachment to them. It is a custom in some countries to condemn the characters of those (after death) that have neither...
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The literary miscellany: or, Selections and extracts, classical ..., Volume 9

1812
...pleasure than building ; which, were it to remain in equal perfection, would at best begin to moulder and want repairs in imagination. Now trees have a circumstance...dilapidation, serve to wean us from our attachment to them. It is a custom in some countries to condemn the characters of those (after death) that have neither...
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The British Prose Writers...: Cowley's essays. Shenstone's essays

1821
...pleasure than building, which, were it to remain in equal perfection, would, at best, begin to moulder and want repairs in imagination. Now trees have a circumstance...dilapidation, serve to wean us from our attachment to them. It is a custom in some countries to condemn the characters of those (after death) that have neither...
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Essays on Men and Manners

William Shenstone - 1868 - 340 pages
...pleasure, than building ; which, were it to remain in equal perfection, would at best begin to moulder and want repairs in imagination. Now trees have a circumstance...our love of life to take root and flourish with them ; •< them ; whereas the very sameness of our structures will, without the help of dilapidation, serve...
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Essays on Men and Manners

William Shenstone - 1868 - 340 pages
...pleasure, than building; which, were it to remain in equal perfection, would at best begin to moulder and want repairs in imagination. Now trees have a circumstance...indeed, if they cause our love of life to take root and nourish with them ; whereas the very sameness of our structures will, without the help of dilapidation,...
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The biblical museum. Old Testament, Volume 1

James Comper Gray - 1876
...rhaa building, which, were it t > remain in equal perfection, w uld at best begiu to moulder and wunt repairs in imagination. N"ow, trees have a circumstance that suits our taste, and that ie annual variety." — sh&ulone. -If it be the characteristic of a worldly man that he desecrates...
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Treasury of Thought: Forming an Encyclopædia of Quotations from Ancient and ...

Maturin Murray Ballou - 1894 - 579 pages
...pleasure than building; which, were it to remain in equal perfection, would at best begin to moulder and want repairs in imagination. Now trees have a circumstance that suits our taste, and that i annual variety. — Shenstone. TRIALS. TRIFLES. Trees the most lovingly shelter and shade us when,...
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