Page images
PDF
EPUB

Justices of district

courts

mon pleas shall, upon notice to the justice, proceed, without unnecessary delay, to hear the parties, and the testimony, and shall restore or remove the justice, as may be just.

Modified from 1 R. S., 319, § 57.

§ 174. The justices of the district and police

and police courts of the city of New York are elected by the

justices in New York

city.

Justices of justices courts, jus.

electors of their respective districts at the charter election in the year 1863, and every sixth year thereafter, and each holds his office six

years.

No

person is eligible to the office except a counselor

at-law.

Laws of 1857, ch. 793; 1851, p. 937; 1852, p. 51; id., ch. 324.

§ 175. The mode of electing the justices of jus

tices of the tices' courts in cities, justices of the peace in cities,

peace and

police just

and of police justices in cities, when not provided in this article, is provided by the several charters and by special statutes.

CHAPTER V.

MINISTERIAL AND OTHER OFFICERS CONNECTED WITH THE COURTS.

ARTICLE I. Number and designation.

II. Mode of election or appointment.

ARTICLE I.

NUMBER AND DESIGNATION.

§ 176. The number and designation of ministerial and other officers connected with the courts is as follows:

A sheriff, a county clerk, a district attorney, and four coroners for the city and county of New York; and the same for each other county, except that in the county of Rensselaer the number of coroners is five, one of whom must reside in the village of Greenbush,' and in the county of Queens the number of coroners is six, who must be so chosen that one shall reside in each town in that county;'

A register for the city and county of New York, and for each of the counties of Kings and Westchester;

A clerk of the court of appeals, and a deputy clerk;'

A state reporter for the court of appeals;*

1 R. S., 305; Laws of 1852,
ch. 289; 1857, ch. 715.

* 1859, ch. 127.

3

Const., art. VI., § 19; 1 R. S., 328, § 10.

1 R. S., 304, § 1.

A clerk of the supreme court of the city of New York, of the court of common pleas of the city and county of New York, and of the superior court of Buffalo; deputy clerks, and as many bailiffs as the courts respectively may authorize their clerks to appoint;'

So many assistants of the surrogate of the county of New York as he may deem necessary, not exceeding the limit which the board of supervisors prescribe;'

A clerk for the surrogate of Erie, when the board of supervisors recommend that one be appointed; '

3

One or more clerks for the surrogate of Kings;'

Б

A clerk for the marine court of the city of New York; three deputies; and bailiffs necessary to attend that court;'

A clerk of each of the district and the police courts of that city, and a deputy clerk for such of the clerks of the district courts as appoint one;"

The present provisions are substantially to the same effect (Laws of 1847, ch. 432, p. 560, § 3; 1852, ch. 44, p. 39, § 1; Code of Procedure, § 39; Laws of 1853, ch. 529, p. 992; Laws of 1854, ch. 198, p. 464, § 1), except that the limit to the number of assistants to the clerk of the New York superior court is to be prescribed by the supervisors. This provision we have omitted.

2 Laws of 1847, ch. 332, § 7.

Laws of 1857, ch. 789.

Laws of 1819, ch. 173.

Laws of 1857, ch. 295.

Laws of 1853, ch. 529, p. 992.
Laws of 1857, § 71.

Laws of 1852, ch. 647.

A clerk for the city court of Brooklyn, and a deputy clerk if he appoints such;'

A clerk for each of the justices' courts in cities;'
A crier of each court of record;

A clerk to take testimony in the county of Kings; '

A clerk of the court of oyer and terminer and sessions of the city and county of New York, and a deputy clerk of the same in case the clerk appoint such;*

A clerk in each of the cities of Hudson, Schenectady, Buffalo, Syracuse, Oswego, Auburn, Utica, Rochester, Brooklyn;

A marshal for each of the cities of Schenectady, Troy, Oswego, Auburn, Utica, Poughkeepsie ;

5

So many attorneys and counselors as are from time to time admitted to practice;

An attorney of the Seneca nation of Indians; °

Three hundred commissioners of deeds and not more than five hundred notaries public, for the city and county of New York;'

11 R. S., 305; Laws of 1849,
170, 7, 8, as amended by
Laws of 1850, 948, §§ 2, 3.

21 R. S., 305.

'Laws of 1856, ch. 166.

4

♦ 1 R. S., 305; Ib., 328, § 8.

1 R. S., 305; Laws of 1854, ch. 90.

1 R. S., 305, 307.

1 R. S., 305; 1853, ch. 340; 1854, ch. 92; 1858, 44; 1859, ch. 485.

Not more than twenty-five notaries public in the city of Troy ;'

Eight commissioners of deeds in the city of Auburn ; '

2

So many commissioners of deeds in each of the cities of the state, except the cities of New York and Auburn, and so many notaries public in each, except the cities of New York and Troy, as shall from time to time be determined in the following

manner:

3

The common councils of the several cities, except New York and Auburn, on or before the first day of January, 1861, and at the end of every two years thereafter, shall, by resolution, fix the number of commissioners of deeds, to be appointed for their respective cities; and on or before the 1st day of January, 1860, and at the end of every two years thereafter, the common councils of the several cities, except New York and Troy, shall fix, in the same manner, the number of notaries public, to be appointed for their respective cities;*

A copy of each determination of the number of commissioners of deeds and of notaries public, under the corporate seal of the city, and attested by the mayor, shall be transmitted to the governor within twenty days after the same has been made;

Laws of 1858, ch. 57, p. 91. 2 Laws of 1859, 431, § 7.

1 R. S., 307, § 5.

1 R. S., 307, § 2.

« PreviousContinue »