An Autobiography: My Schools and Schoolmasters; Or, The Story of My Education

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Gould and Lincoln, 1854 - 537 pages
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[One mezzotint engraving with] reference to being copied from a Talbotype: it is unusual to find this, especially in the United States. This illustration is from one of Hill and Adamson's earliest photographs, dating from 1843. Miller killed himself in 1856"--Hanson Collection catalog, p. 15.
 

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Page 377 - We have not been drawn and trussed, in order that we may be filled, like stuffed birds in a museum, with chaff and ra'gs and paltry blurred shreds of paper about the rights of man.
Page i - Love had he found in huts where poor Men lie : His daily Teachers had been Woods and Rills, The silence that is in the starry sky, The sleep that is among the lonely hills.
Page 411 - Ortogrul mingled with the attendants ; and being supposed to have some petition for the vizier, was permitted to enter. He surveyed the spaciousness of the apartments, admired the walls hung with golden tapestry, and the floors covered with silken carpets; and despised the simple neatness of his own little habitation. "Surely...
Page 37 - At Wallace' name, what Scottish blood But boils up in a spring-tide flood ! Oft have our fearless fathers strode By Wallace' side, Still pressing onward, red-wat shod, Or glorious died.
Page 27 - I actually found out for myself, that the art of reading is the art of finding stories in books, and from that moment reading became one of the most delightful of my amusements.
Page 153 - Others apart sat on a hill retired, In thoughts more elevate, and reasoned high Of Providence, Foreknowledge, Will, and Fate— Fixed fate, free will, foreknowledge absolute— And found no end, in wandering mazes lost.
Page 25 - Firth, and to look wistfully out, long after every one else had ceased to hope, for the sloop with the two stripes of white and the two square topsails. But months and years passed by, and the white stripes and the square topsails I never saw.
Page 68 - ... terminating just where, after clearing the sea, it overhung the gravelly beach at an elevation of nearly ten feet. Adown we both dropped, proud of our success ; up splashed the rattling gravel as we fell ; and for at least the whole coming week — though we were unaware of the extent of our good luck at the time — the marvels of the Doocot Cave might be regarded as solely and exclusively our own. For one short seven days — to borrow emphasis from the phraseology of Carlyle — " they were...
Page 208 - A roar of laughter from every corner of the barrack precluded reply ; and in the laughter, after an embarrassed pause, the poor man had the good sense to join. And during the rest of the season I baked as often and as much as I pleased. It is, I believe, Goldsmith who remarks, that " wit generally succeeds more from being happily addressed, than from its native poignancy...
Page 174 - Wi' life an' light; Or winter howls, in gusty storms, The lang, dark night! The Muse, nae poet ever fand her, Till by himsel he learn'd to wander, Adown some trottin burn's meander, An' no think lang: O sweet to stray, an' pensive ponder A heart-felt sang!

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