The Religious Aspect of Philosophy: A Critique of the Bases of Conduct and of Faith, Volume 3

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1885 - 484 pages
 

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Page 217 - Oh that I knew where I might find him ! That I might come even to his seat ! I would order my cause before him, And fill my mouth with arguments.
Page 217 - Behold, I go forward, but he is not there; and backward, but I cannot perceive him: On the left hand, where he doth work, but I cannot behold him: he hideth himself on the right hand, that I cannot see him.
Page 338 - Now it is plain they have an existence exterior to my mind, since I find them by experience to be independent of it. There is therefore some other mind wherein they exist, during the intervals between the times of my perceiving them : as likewise they did before my birth, and would do after my supposed annihilation.
Page 338 - When I deny sensible things an existence out of the mind, I do not mean my mind in particular, but all minds. Now it is plain they have an existence exterior to my mind, since I find them by experience to be independent of it.
Page 156 - He seems to thee a little less living than thou; his life is dim, it is cold, it is a pale fire beside thy own burning desires.... So, dimly and by instinct hast thou lived with thy neighbor, and hast known him not, being blind. Thou hast made [of him] a thing, no Self at all. Have done with this illusion...
Page 338 - ... wherein they exist, during the intervals between the times of my perceiving them : as likewise they did before my birth, and would do after my supposed annihilation. And as the same is true, with regard to all other finite created spirits, it necessarily follows, there is an omnipresent eternal Mind, which knows and comprehends all things, and exhibits them to our view in such a manner, and according to such rules, as he himself hath ordained, and are by us termed the laws of nature.
Page 205 - In him who has intercourse (with others) affections arise, (and then) the pain which follows affection ; considering the misery that originates in affection let one wander alone like a rhinoceros.
Page 32 - The future, till the past be gulfd in darkness, It is not of my search. — My mother Earth ! And thou fresh breaking Day, and you, ye Mountains, Why are ye beautiful ? I cannot love ye. And thou, the...
Page 49 - The fact then appears to be, that we are constituted so as to condemn falsehood, unprovoked violence, injustice, and to approve of benevolence to some preferably to others, abstracted from all consideration, which conduct is likeliest to produce an overbalance of happiness or misery.

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