Healthy homes and foods for the working classes

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Republican Press Assn., 1886 - 62 pages
 

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Page 28 - Although the rations suggested in the preceding tables do not contain meat, they do contain more or less animal food, and are healthy. However, the writer would not recommend one to adhere constantly to them, as some meat, while not necessary to health, does undoubtedly increase bodily vigor. The small amount of really nutritive matter in tea is not considered, and the reader is referred to the articles "Tea " and " Coffee" for a true explanation of the food values of these drinks. It will be seen...
Page 10 - Place a tin or sheet iron pipe, of from six to ten inches in diameter, according to the size of the room, along the wall behind the stove. The lower end of this pipe extends to within a few inches of the floor, and remains open, while the upper end passes, by means of an elbow, into the smoke flue below the point at which the stove pipe enters, as shown in the accompanying Fig.
Page 9 - In this way two air-vents in the window are established, one under the lower sash, the current of which is turned upward by the cloth, and the other between the upper and lower sash, as when the board is used. Through the upper vent it is supposed that some of the foul air will escape, though the current through this opening is not invariably outward. What is known as Maine's elbow-tube ventilator consists of a board placed under a raised sash, as already described. This board carries two tubes,...
Page 14 - ... of iron is unfit for constant use. Deep wells should have their walls so protected as not to permit of surface water finding its way through them. If this is not the case, their waters may become quite as foul as those of shallow wells. Subterranean waters are often hard. By this is meant that they fail to make a lather with soap, or a large amount of soap must be used with them in order to produce a lather. The hardness of water is due to the presence of certain inorganic salts, as those of...
Page 25 - The muscles, blood, and tissues also contain salts of potash and soda, and some iron. One of the most important mineral foods is common salt or the chloride of sodium. Water. About 70 per cent of the adult body is water. It forms the greater part of the vital fluid, in which it serves as the carrier of other substances, some in solution, others held in suspension. Besides the fluids, the solid tissues contain a greater or less proportion of water ; the muscles contain as much as 75 per cent. There...
Page 22 - Here people of all kinds are congregated, and the noise of the boisterous will disturb the rest of the quiet ; the filth of the slovenly is likely to injure the health of those who endeavor to keep everything about them clean ; and the habits of the immoral are distasteful to the moral. However, on account of poverty, many good people are compelled, for a time at least, to occupy rooms in a tenement-house. Unfortunately, the majority of such houses are built for the purpose of making as large pecuniary...

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