Essays--Modern

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Macmillan and Company, 1883 - 334 pages
 

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Page 318 - Under the arch of Life, where love and death, Terror and mystery, guard her shrine, I saw Beauty enthroned ; and though her gaze struck awe, I drew it in as simply as my breath. Hers are the eyes which, over and beneath, The sky and sea bend on thee, — which can draw, By sea or sky or woman, to one law, The allotted bondman of her palm and wreath. This is that Lady Beauty, in whose praise Thy voice and hand shake still, — long known to thee...
Page 330 - Love's own breast, — Where round the secret of all spheres All angels lay their wings to rest, — How shall my soul stand rapt and awed, When, by the new birth borne abroad Throughout the music of the suns, It enters in her soul at once And knows the silence there for God ! Here with her face doth memory sit Meanwhile, and wait the day's decline, Till other eyes shall look from it, Eyes of the spirit's Palestine, Even than the old gaze tenderer : While hopes and aims long lost with her Stand round...
Page 319 - Hers are the eyes which, over and beneath, The sky and sea bend on thee, — which can draw, By sea or sky or woman, to one law, The allotted bondman of her palm and wreath. This is that Lady Beauty, in whose praise Thy voice and hand shake still, — -long known to thee By flying hair and fluttering hem, — the beat Following her daily of thy heart and feet, How passionately and irretrievably, In what fond flight, how many ways and days!
Page 22 - Or rather, what he desired was hardly what we call democracy ; for he defines democracy as "the progress of all through all, under the leadership of the best and wisest.
Page 324 - NOT I myself know all my love for thee : How should I reach so far, who cannot weigh To-morrow's dower by gage of yesterday ? Shall birth and death, and all dark names that be As doors and windows bared to some loud sea, Lash deaf mine ears and blind my face with spray ; And shall my sense pierce love, — the last relay And ultimate outpost of eternity...
Page 154 - Elle était pâle, et pourtant rose, Petite avec de grands cheveux. Elle disait souvent : Je n'ose, Et ne disait jamais : Je veux. Le soir, elle prenait ma Bible Pour y faire épeler sa sœur, Et, comme une lampe paisible, Elle éclairait ce jeune cœur. Sur le saint livre que j'admire Leurs yeux purs venaient se fixer; Livre où l'une apprenait à lire, Où l'autre apprenait à penser!
Page 328 - Look in my face ; my name is Might-have-been ; I am also called No-more, Too-late, Farewell ; Unto thine ear I hold the dead-sea shell Cast up thy Life's foam-fretted feet between ; Unto thine eyes the glass where that is seen Which had Life's form and Love's, but by my spell Is now a shaken shadow intolerable, Of ultimate things unuttered the frail screen. Mark me, how still I am ! But should...
Page 325 - Sometimes thou seem'st not as thyself alone, But as the meaning of all things that are; A breathless wonder, shadowing forth afar Some heavenly solstice hushed and halcyon; Whose unstirred lips are music's visible tone; Whose eyes the sun-gate of the soul unbar, Being of its furthest fires oracular; — The evident heart of all life sown and mown.
Page 268 - I remember how at Cambridge I walked with her once in the Fellows' Garden of Trinity, on an evening of a rainy May, and she, stirred somewhat beyond her wont, and taking as her text the three words which have been used so often as the inspiring...
Page 324 - ... yesterday ? Shall birth and death, and all dark names that be As doors and windows bared to some loud sea, Lash deaf mine ears and blind my face with spray ; And shall my sense pierce love, — the last relay And ultimate outpost of eternity ? Lo ! what am I to Love, the lord of all ? One murmuring shell he gathers from the sand, — One little heart-flame sheltered in his hand. Yet through thine eyes he grants me clearest call And veriest touch of powers primordial That any hour-girt life may...

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