Railroad Freight Transportation

Front Cover
D. Appleton, 1922 - 771 pages
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Contents

Grades
11
Locomotives of 1869 and 1897 Pennsylvania Lines
14
Layout for Helper Engine Service or Doublingthe Hill
15
Obsolete Lines
17
Flying Junctions and Interlocked Crossings
24
Water Stations
27
Water Supply
28
Water Treatment
29
Coal Tipples
30
Track Scales
31
Interlocking and Block Signals
32
SECTION PAGE 31 Terminal Depots and Adjuncts
34
Freight House Pennsylvania Railroad Indianapolis
39
Terminal Yards
44
Yard Operation
46
Gravity Yards
48
Yard Planning
49
Yard Accessories
50
Engine House Layout with Gridiron Outbound Storage
51
Yard Office
53
Belt Lines
54
Transfer Tracks
55
Subclassification Gridiron or StationOrder Yard
56
Facilities for Trains Taking On or Setting Out Cuts Only
57
Yard Lighting
58
Faulty Yards
60
The Look Ahead
62
PART II
65
SECTION PAGE 66 Car Repair Shops Tracks and Floating Gangs
67
The Present Status
76
Provision of Cars
84
SHOPS AND EQUIPMENT
86
Engine House
90
Barracks
92
Locomotives
100
Master Mechanic
101
Stokers
109
Future Possibilities
111
Service Power
112
Articulated Locomotives
113
Wreck Train
114
SC Snow Plows
115
Track Inspection Car
116
Dynamometer Car
118
Narrow Gauge Railroad
119
Comparison of Steam and Electrical Working
120
Effect of Winter Weather
122
Braking on Heavy Grades
123
Fuel Consumption
124
PART III
129
ORGANIZATION FIELD AND STAFF 92 Organization
131
The General Manager
142
General Superintendent
147
Superintendent of Personnel
148
Superintendent of Safety
151
Police Service
153
Division Superintendent
155
Trainmaster
157
Yardmaster
159
Division Agent
163
Methods in Administration
169
Intercompany Arrangements and Standard Practices
177
Extracorporate Relations
183
Commercial and Financial Chronicle
192
Railway and Locomotive Engineering
198
Relationship of Auditor to Transportation
206
Engine Rating for One Per Cent Grade Speed Eight
213
Audits and Inventories
215
Depreciation
222
Freight Forwarded Book
229
General Accounts and Miscellaneous Matters
241
SECTION PAGE 141 Statistics
245
Terminal Freight Stations
249
Car Loading
250
Train Loading
252
Engine Mileage or Engine Hours
253
Probability
255
PART V
259
The Personnel
260
Proportions of the Time that Cars are in Use by the Railroads and by the Traders
261
Distribution of the Time of a Freight Car Movement
264
The Stock of Cars in the Country and the Use Made of Them
269
The Demands of the Traffic and the Provisions for Meeting Them
286
Minimum Weights
288
Reconsignment
305
To Order Bills of Lading
308
The Transportation of Explosives and Other Dangerous Articles
312
Tracing Carload and Less Carload Freight
356
Road Handling
361
BadOrder Cars
367
Sailing Day Plan
374
Loaded and Empty Mileage
378
Car Pools
381
Per Diem
383
Clearing House 392
392
Car Service Rules
393
Embargoes
397
Code of M C B Rules
403
Car Ownership
407
MOVEMENT OF ENGINES AND TRAINS
417
SECTION PAGE 175 Development of Steam Transport
419
Newcomen
424
Watt
427
Trevithick
430
Fulton
434
Stephenson
436
The Engine
448
Movement at Terminals
449
Movement on the Road
453
Engine Rating
456
Shops of Delaware and Hudson Co Colonie
461
Assistant Engines
469
Pusher Engines
471
Engine Failures
479
Yard Work
481
Road Work
486
Drop and Pickup Freight Trains
489
Preference Freight Trains
490
Detouring
491
Standard Time
493
Uniform Train Signals
498
Standard Code of Train Rules and Telegraph Orders
499
Block System and Interlocking Signals
511
Planes
518
Economic Waste
522
PART VII
525
General Rules Governing Employees Operating Depart ment
527
General Rules Governing the Determination of Physical Qualifications of Employees Operating Department
528
The Transportation Men
529
The Office Clerical Force
531
Station Agent
533
Telegraph and Block Operators
538
SECTION PAGE 209 The Crew of the Train
539
Fireman
540
Engineman
541
87
542
Coal
545
Lubrication
548
Working the Locomotive
549
The Train Crew
551
Changing Conditions and Practices
554
Requirements and Education
563
The Work of the Crew of the Train
565
Yard Crew
568
Wages
574
Early Conditions1828 1839 1850 1863
575
Demand of 1888
579
Demand of 1891
580
Demand of 1892
582
29 Advance of 1906
583
Effect of the Award of May 14 1910
588
Engineers Arbitration Eastern Territory 1912
596
Engineers Firemens and Hostlers Arbitration West ern Territory 19131915
600
Concerted Movements
604
The Adamson Law
609
Conduct of Negotiations
616
Mediation
617
Wage Differential
618
Stardard of Living
620
Relative Wages
621
The United States Railroad Labor Board
622
Working Conditions
624
PieceWork
629
Seniority
630
Overtime
632
Railroad Provident Institutions
673
Frank Thomson Scholarships
683
Open Shop
697
Parasitic Labor
709
Strike on the Chicago Burlington Quincy Railroad
715
The Grammar of Industry
723
INDEX
737
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