Poems

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Cosimo, Inc., 2007 M10 1 - 328 pages
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Perhaps no writer has so dramatically shaped the course of American philosophy as Ralph Waldo Emerson, whose meditations on spirituality, freedom, and the power of knowledge have informed and inspired generations of activists, scholars, and thinkers. This replica edition of a 1914 collection of his most profound and influential poetry includes: . "Each and All" . "The World-Soul" . "Mithridates" . "The Rhodora" . "Woodnotes I" and "II" . "Etienne de la Boce" . "Compensation" . "Ode to Beauty" . "Bacchus" . "The Apology" . poems on nature and life, the elements, quatrains, "mottoes to the 'essays'" . and many, many more. American poet and philosopher RALPH WALDO EMERSON (1803-1882), the "Sage of Concord," was a driving force behind the Transcendental Movement of the early 19th century and remains a major figure in American literature. His works include Representative Men (1850), The Conduct of Life (1860), Society and Solitude (1870), and Parnassus (1875).
 

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Contents

The Srarax
6
To Bhba il
22
Fate
28
Goodbye
36
BBKBTOia
43
WOOBNOTES II
60
Fable
77
Imennb be la Boece
84
Sono o Nature
245
Two Rivers
249
Waldbinsamxeit
250
Terminus
252
The Past
254
The Last Farewell
255
experiehob
261
Compensation
262

Stjbotm Gobda
91
Give All to Lgyb
98
Ti Amtolbt
101
Hkemioni
107
Tub Amumv
121
Bacchus
127
Saabi
133
holidays
139
GlJAHgLLB
147
MlISKBTAQUIB
155
DlROB 108
170
NjEMiaw
206
Voluntaries
215
Lovbko Petition
221
Tub Tbbt
227
Nature I
230
Natueb II
231
Tee Romany Girl
232
Days
234
The Chartists Complaint
235
Garden
238
The Titmouse
239
SeaShore
243
Politics
264
HEROISM
265
Character v
266
Culture
267
Friendship
268
Beauty 299
269
Manners
270
Art
271
Spiritual Laws
272
Unity
273
Worship
274
Quatrains
275
Translations 233
283
Hymn
292
Graoe 204
295
Wealth
296
Illusions
298
Boston
300
History
305
Prudence
306
Imijkx Trnra
311
Copyright

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Page 6 - The delicate shells lay on the shore; The bubbles of the latest wave Fresh pearls to their enamel gave, And the bellowing of the savage sea Greeted their safe escape to me. I wiped away the weeds and foam, I fetched my sea-born treasures home; But the poor, unsightly, noisome things Had left their beauty on the shore With the sun and the sand and the wild uproar.
Page 6 - I thought the sparrow's note from heaven, Singing at dawn on the alder bough; I brought him home, in his nest, at even; He sings the song, but it cheers not now, For I did not bring home the river and sky; He sang to my ear, they sang to my eye.
Page 7 - I covet truth; Beauty is unripe childhood's cheat; I leave it behind with the games of youth:' As I spoke, beneath my feet The ground-pine curled its pretty wreath, Running over the club-moss burrs; I inhaled the violet's breath; Around me stood the oaks and firs; Pine-cones and acorns lay on the ground; Over me soared the eternal sky. Full of light and of deity; Again I saw, again I heard, The rolling river, the morning bird; Beauty through my senses stole; I yielded myself to the perfect whole.
Page 8 - The hand that rounded Peter's dome, And groined the aisles of Christian Rome, Wrought in a sad sincerity: Himself from God he could not free; He builded better than he knew : The conscious stone to beauty grew.

About the author (2007)

Known primarily as the leader of the philosophical movement transcendentalism, which stresses the ties of humans to nature, Ralph Waldo Emerson, American poet and essayist, was born in Boston in 1803. From a long line of religious leaders, Emerson became the minister of the Second Church (Unitarian) in 1829. He left the church in 1832 because of profound differences in interpretation and doubts about church doctrine. He visited England and met with British writers and philosophers. It was during this first excursion abroad that Emerson formulated his ideas for Self-Reliance. He returned to the United States in 1833 and settled in Concord, Massachusetts. He began lecturing in Boston. His first book, Nature (1836), published anonymously, detailed his belief and has come to be regarded as his most significant original work on the essence of his philosophy of transcendentalism. The first volume of Essays (1841) contained some of Emerson's most popular works, including the renowned Self-Reliance. Emerson befriended and influenced a number of American authors including Henry David Thoreau. It was Emerson's practice of keeping a journal that inspired Thoreau to do the same and set the stage for Thoreau's experiences at Walden Pond. Emerson married twice (his first wife Ellen died in 1831 of tuberculosis) and had four children (two boys and two girls) with his second wife, Lydia. His first born, Waldo, died at age six. Emerson died in Concord on April 27, 1882 at the age of 78 due to pneumonia and is buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord, Massachusetts.

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