Proceedings of the Canadian Institute: 1884, Volume 1; Volume 3, Part 4

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Canadian Institute., 1884
 

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Page 377 - The sounding cataract Haunted me like a passion : the tall rock, The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, Their colours and their forms were then to me An appetite ; a feeling and a love That had no need of a remoter charm, By thought supplied, or any interest Unborrowed from the eye.
Page 374 - Do not all charms fly At the mere touch of cold philosophy? There was an awful rainbow once in heaven: We know her woof, her texture; she is given In the dull catalogue of common things. Philosophy will clip an Angel's wings, Conquer all mysteries by rule and line, Empty the haunted air, and gnomed mine — Unweave a rainbow, as it erewhile made The tender-person'd Lamia melt into a shade.
Page 379 - Not only cunning casts in clay: Let Science prove we are, and then What matters Science unto men, At least to me ? I would not stay. Let him, the wiser man who springs Hereafter, up from childhood shape His action like the greater ape, But I was born to other things.
Page 373 - The notions of the beginning and the end of the world entertained by our forefathers are no longer credible. It is very certain that the earth is not the chief body in the material universe and that the world is not subordinated to man's use. It is even more certain that nature is the expression of a definite order with which nothing interferes and that the chief business of mankind is to learn that order and govern themselves accordingly.
Page 379 - I trust I have not wasted breath : I think we are not wholly brain, Magnetic mockeries ; not in vain, Like Paul with beasts, I fought with Death; Not only cunning casts in clay: Let Science prove we are, and then What matters Science unto men, At least to me ? I would not stay.
Page 383 - Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.
Page 374 - What without him is summer's pomp, Or winter's frozen shade ? I travail in pain for him, My creatures travail and wait ; His couriers come by squadrons, He comes not to the gate. Twice I have moulded an image, And thrice outstretched my hand, Made one of day, and one of night, And one of the salt sea-sand. One in a Judsean manger, And one by Avon stream, One over against the mouths of Nile, And one in the Academe.
Page 376 - LONG lines of cliff breaking have left a chasm ; And in the chasm are foam and yellow sands ; Beyond, red roofs about a narrow wharf In cluster; then a moulder'd church; and higher A long street climbs to one tall-tower'd mill; And high in heaven behind it a gray down With Danish barrows ; and a hazelwood, By autumn nutters haunted, flourishes Green in a cuplike hollow of the down.
Page 368 - The squares of the times of revolution of any two planets are to each other, in the same proportion as the cubes of their mean distances from the sun.
Page 23 - The Polynesian groups are everywhere separated from South America by a vast expanse of ocean, where rough waves and perpetually adverse winds and currents oppose access from the west. In attempting, from any part of Polynesia, to reach America, a canoe would naturally and almost necessarily be conveyed to the northern extreme of California ; and this is the precise limit where the second physical race of men makes its appearance. So well understood is the course of navigation, that San Francisco,...

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