A Compendium of Modern Husbandry: Principally Written During a Survey of Surrey, Made at the Desire of the Board of Agriculture; Illustrative Also of the Best Practices in the Neighbouring Counties, Kent, Sussex, &c.; in which is Comprised an Analysis of Manures Shewing Their Chemical Contents, and the Proper Application of Them to Soils and Plants of All Descriptions; Also an Essay on Timber Exhibiting a View of the Increasing Scarcity of that Important Article, with Hints on the Means of Counteracting It; Together with a Variety of Miscellaneous Subjects Peculiarly Adapted to the the Present State of the Internal Economy of the Kingdom, Volume 2

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Page 143 - And he gave it for his opinion, that whoever could make two ears of corn, or two blades of grass to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to his country than the whole race of politicians put together.
Page 197 - ... weather, and the condition of the dung; in Summer, in ten days or sooner ; in Winter, not perhaps for many weeks, if the cold is severe.
Page 195 - ... and check the fermentation. When a beginning is thus made, the workmen will proceed working backwards, and adding to the column of compost, as they are furnished with the three rows of materials directed to be laid down for them. They must take care not to tread on the compost, or render it too compact; and, of consequence, in proportion as the peat is wet, it should be made up i:i lumps, and not much broken.
Page 525 - July (the season for fire-blasts, as the planters call them), seen the vines in the middle of a hop ground all scorched up, almost from one end of a large ground to the other, when a hot gleam of sunshine has come immediately after a shower of rain; at which time the vapours are...
Page 196 - ... sawings of timber, &c. And as some sorts of dung, even when fresh, are much more advanced in decomposition than others, it is material to attend to this ; for a much less proportion of such dung as is less advanced, will serve for the compost, provided care is taken to keep the mass sufficiently open, either by a mixture of the above-mentioned substances, or if these are wanting, by adding the...
Page 503 - The earth is pressed round the roots, and the cut parts covered so as to exclude the air. A pole about twelve feet long is then firmly stuck into the ground near the plants ; to this the bines are led and tied as they shoot...
Page 281 - What the farmers call the yellows in wheat, and which they consider as a kind of mildew, is, in fact, occasioned by a small yellow fly, with blue wings, about the size of a gnat. This blows in the ear of the corn, and produces a worm, almost invisible to the naked eye ; but, being seen through a pocket microscope, it appears a large yellow maggot, of the...
Page 197 - ... weeks of using, when it should be turned over, upside down, and outside in, and all lumps broken : then it comes into a second heat, but soon cools and is fit to be taken out for use.
Page 194 - ... workmen, in making up the compost, may be able to throw them together by the spade. In making up, let the workmen begin at one end ; and at the extremity of the row of dung, (which should not extend quite so far at that end as the rows of...
Page 523 - T part of an inch deep, besides what evaporated, from the earth. And this quantity of moisture in a kindly state of the air is daily .carried off in a sufficient quantity to keep the hops in a healthy state; but in a rainy moist state of air, without a due mixture of dry weather, too much moisture hovers about the hops, so as to hinder in a good measure the kindly perspiration of the leaves, whereby the stagnating sap corrupts, and breeds mouldy fen, which often spoils vast quantities of flourishing...