Modern Poetry after Modernism

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1997 M11 27 - 224 pages
In this book, James Longenbach develops a fresh approach to major American poetry after modernism. Rethinking the influential "breakthrough" narrative, the oft-told story of postmodern poets throwing off their modernist shackles in the 1950s, Longenbach offers a more nuanced perspective. Reading a diverse range of poets--John Ashbery, Elizabeth Bishop, Amy Clampitt, Jorie Graham, Richard Howard, Randall Jarrell, Robert Lowell, Robert Pinsky, and Richard Wilbur--Longenbach reveals that American poets since mid- century have not so much disowned their modernist past as extended elements of modernism that other readers have suppressed or neglected to see. In the process, Longenbach allows readers to experience the wide variety of poetries written in our time-- without asking us to choose between them.
 

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Contents

What Was Postmodern Poetry?
3
Elizabeth Bishops Bramble Bushes
22
Elizabeth Bishops Social Conscience
35
Randall Jarrells Semifeminine Mind
49
Richard Wilburs Small World
65
John Ashberys Individual Talent
85
Amy Clampitts United States
102
Richard Howards Modern World
122
Robert Pinskys Social Nature
141
Jorie Grahams Big Hunger
158
Notes
177
Index
197
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

James Longenbach is the Joseph H. Gilmore Professor of English at the University of Rochester. In addition to a forthcoming volume of poems called Threshold, he is the author of Wallace Stevens: The Plain Sense of Things (OUP, 1991), Stone Cottage: Pound, Yeats, and Modernism (OUP, 1988), and Modernist Poetics of History.

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