An Historical Syntax of the English Language

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Brill Archive, 2002 - 27 pages
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The aim of this study is to provide an outline of the development, from the earliest times to the present day, of all the English syntatical constructions with a verbal form as their nucleus. Professor Visser's description is based on a very extensive collection of documentary material covering every kind of writing in prose and poetry in the Old, Middle and Modern periods, drawing on quotations illustrating syntactical phenomena in Bosworth & Toller, O.E.D., M.M.E.D., E.D.D., and D.O.S.T., but also making reference to obsolete usages not found in any grammar, and to the views of English and American grammarians of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries on the various syntactical constructions. The volumes of this work originally appeared in the early sixties and seventies and were well received by readers and reviewers. Volumes 1 and 2 underwent correction in the light of these early reactions. We should like to think that this work will continue to be available to the scholarly world without great increases in the price. We are however only reprinting the individual volumes in small numbers, and so we have decided that in order to guarantee a consistent reprint and pricing policy for the future, the work should be available henceforth only as a set of four volumes.
 

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Contents

Bibliography
643
THE PRESENT TENSE FORM
661
B TIMESPHERE THE FUTURE
669
Futural Present 71722
678
Type Folke called vpon hym you fall you fall 732
684
Futural can must may will and ought 736
692
Adverbial Clauses 87795
693
have done it versus before I shall have done it 754
702
Type Thou canst not be so great a brute as to slight her? 964
1016
After and 1157
1021
Type Better is to deie than to lyue in such greuence 968
1022
Type Clene religion is helpen widuwen 917
1026
THE INFINITIVE AFTER A PREPOSITION
1031
Introduction 977
1038
Type Brennende fyre soukynge childryn 1043
1043
Types How to question hem? Why not give it up? 983
1048

Present tense in narratives as a variant of the Preterite 76079
726
Type 579 B C Nebuchadnezar takes Tyre 784
732
CHAPTER
745
In adverbial clauses not opening with conjunction
751
Type sume cwædon he is crist 8212
774
Type He said that he believes me 830
780
CHAPTER SEVEN
786
THE MODALLY MARKED FORM
795
Type Thy lady sent aftir hir frendes alle
798
Type Ne ondrede du versus Ne ondred du 842
801
Type He asked who preached tomorrow Futural
804
Type Ciricsceattas sin agifene be sce Martines mæssan 8479
810
Type O that I had wings 8123
814
Subject Clauses 8638
821
Type Thus repulsed our final hope is that despair 1149
823
Type He næfde hwanon he hyt agulde 875
856
In adverbial clauses S 81920
866
Of manner 887
918
Middle English 11523
928
CHAPTER EIGHT
942
THE INFINITIVE AS SUBJECT
948
Type She wepte that pity was to hereſ 902
954
Type Would you not suppose Your bondage happy to be made a Queene?
956
Type It is nat good for to take the breed of sonys 909
960
Type It was semely to pe for to folowe swych a rowte 913
967
THE INFINITIVE AS OBJECT
975
Type He broughte a yerde to scourge the child 929
981
Type He stood in aunter for to die 934
987
Type He was an easy man to yeve penaunce 941
993
Type He bore his sword to the cutlers to grinde 947
999
Preceded by preposition 1156
1003
Type He was a shrewed chamberlein So to beguile a worthi queene 954
1005
Type Yet woulde he not To dye therfore confesse himself faulty 957
1008
Type A desire of enlarging his Empire
1049
Type As for to speken in comune Thei folwen the favour of Fortune 989
1054
Type I kept on I had to 1000
1061
THE FORM IN
1069
Type And knocking at the gate twas opend wide
1072
Development of the various endings 101931
1079
I109
1112
THE FORM IN ING AS A PREDICATIVE ADJUNCT
1118
Type Knowing causes loving 10524
1125
Type The king hearing this was stupefact 1062
1132
Confusion in spelling of endings in Middle English 102730
1136
idem cause reason ground 10634
1138
THE ABSOLUTE ING ADJUNCT
1147
idem condition 1082
1157
Type His delight was to lift up the fallen
1158
Type It was difficult to see properly and the train moving all the time Ş 1089
1163
The collocations for a stonyd for pure abaissht
1164
Type From the arysing of the sonne 1095
1170
Type At the sun rising S 10961101
1182
1
1191
Type Excuse his throwing into the water SS 11067
1196
Type Wenches sitt in the shade singing of ballads 1121
1203
Type Pending the result I want you to remain 1125
1217
CHAPTER
1223
Type A returned soldier in search of workſ 1129
1232
II34
1237
Type This lovesmitten gentlemen 1137
1240
1200
1245
Type A mirour polisshed brighť 1141
1246
Type A poore man met the bishop riding on his gelding 1072
1252
THE PAST PARTICIPLE USED INDEPENDENTLY
1296
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