Studies in Philosophy and Literature

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C.K. Paul & Company, 1879 - 426 pages
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Page 404 - All thinking things, all objects of all thought, And rolls through all things. Therefore am I still A lover of the meadows and the woods, And mountains; and of all that we behold From this green earth ; of all the mighty world Of eye and ear, both what they half create *, And what perceive...
Page 279 - The majority of the following poems are to be considered as experiments. They were written chiefly with a view to ascertain how far the language of conversation in the middle and lower classes of society is adapted to the purposes of poetic pleasure.
Page 241 - The common problem, yours, mine, every one's, Is not to fancy what were fair in life Provided it could be,— but, finding first What may be, then find how to make it fair Up to our means— a very different thing!
Page 277 - Trouble not yourself upon their present reception : of what moment is that, compared with what I trust is their destiny ? .—to console the afflicted; to add sunshine to daylight, by making the happy happier; to teach the young and the gracious of every age to see, to think, and feel, and therefore to become more actively and securely virtuous—this is their office, which I trust they will faithfully perform, long after we (that is, all that is mortal of us) are mouldered in our graves.
Page 297 - He found us when the age had bound Our souls in its benumbing round; He spoke, and loosed our heart in tears. He laid us as we lay at birth On the cool flowery lap of earth...
Page 23 - For why ? — because the good old rule Sufficeth them, the simple plan, That they should take, who have the power, And they should keep who can.
Page 273 - W.'s works is, a correspondent weight and sanity of the thoughts and sentiments — won, not from books, but from the poet's own meditative observation. They are fresh, and have the dew upon them.
Page 234 - But for those obstinate questionings Of sense and outward things, Fallings from us, vanishings; Blank misgivings of a creature Moving about in worlds not realized...
Page 276 - It is impossible that any expectations can be lower than mine concerning the immediate effect of this little work upon what is called the public. I do not here take into consideration the envy and malevolence, and all the bad passions which always stand in the way of a work of any merit from a living poet ; but merely think of the pure, absolute, honest...
Page 367 - And unto man he said, Behold, The fear of the LORD, that is wisdom ; And to depart from evil is understanding.

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