The Renascence of the English Drama: Essays, Lectures, and Fragments Relating to the Modern English Stage, Written and Delivered in the Years 1883-94

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Macmillan and Company, 1895 - 343 pages

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Page 71 - Phoebus replied, and touched my trembling ears: "Fame is no plant that grows on mortal soil, Nor in the glistering foil Set off to the world, nor in broad rumour lies, But lives and spreads aloft by those pure eyes And perfect witness of all-judging Jove; As he pronounces lastly on each deed, Of so much fame in heaven expect thy meed.
Page 6 - May the winds blow till they have waken'd death. ! And let the labouring bark climb hills of seas, Olympus-high ; and duck again as low As hell 's from heaven ! If it were now to die, 'Twere now to be most happy ; for, I fear, My soul hath her content so absolute, That not another comfort like to this Succeeds in unknown fate.
Page 151 - Did both find helpers to their hearts' desire, And stuff at hand, plastic as they could wish, — Were called upon to exercise their skill, Not in Utopia, — subterranean fields, — Or some secreted island, Heaven knows where ! But in the very world, which is the world Of all of us, — the place where, in the end, We find our happiness, or not at all...
Page 63 - And grudge to sing those wise and lovely songs Of Fate, and Chance, and God, and Chaos old, And Love and the chained Titan's woful doom, And how he shall be loosed, and make the earth One brotherhood : delightful strains which cheer Our solitary twilights, and which charm To silence the unenvying nightingales.
Page 8 - But the angel of the LORD said to Elijah the Tishbite, Arise, go up to meet the messengers of the king of Samaria, and say unto them, /* it not because there is not a God in Israel, that ye go to inquire of Baal-zebub the god of Ekron? 4 Now therefore thus saith the LORD, Thou shalt not come down from that bed on which thou art gone up, but shalt surely die.
Page 71 - For my part I had rather be damned with Plato and Lord Bacon, than go to Heaven with Paley and Malthus.
Page 209 - The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together: our virtues would be proud if our faults whipped them not; and our crimes would despair if they were not cherished by our virtues.
Page 14 - Our vast society is not homogeneous enough, not sufficiently united, even any large portion of it, in a common view of life, a common ideal, capable of serving as basis for a modern English drama.
Page 90 - God ! that one might read the book of fate, And see the revolution of the times...
Page 39 - I take possession of man's mind and deed. I care not what the sects may brawl. I sit as God holding no form of creed, But contemplating all.

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