The Golden Gems of Life, Or, Gathered Jewels for the Home Circle

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Central Publishing House, 1880 - 608 pages
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Page 255 - It buries every error, covers every defect, extinguishes every resentment ! From its peaceful bosom spring none but fond regrets and tender recollections. Who can look down upon the grave, even of an enemy, and not feel a compunctious throb that he should ever have warred with the poor handful of earth that lies mouldering before him...
Page 222 - ... nothing will supply the want of prudence; and that negligence and irregularity, long continued, will make knowledge useless, wit ridiculous, and genius contemptible.
Page 546 - The day is thine, the night also is thine: thou hast prepared the light and the sun. Thou hast set all the borders of the earth: thou hast made summer and winter.
Page 266 - Truth is always consistent with itself, and needs nothing to help it out ; it is always near at hand, and sits upon our lips and is ready to drop out before we are aware; whereas a lie is troublesome, and sets a man's invention upon the rack, and one trick needs a great many more to make it good.
Page 114 - ... and they go to their graves with purposes unaccomplished and wishes unfulfilled. Better for them, and for the world in their example, had they known how to wait' Believe me, the talent of success is nothing more than doing what you can do well; and doing well whatever you do, — without a thought of fame.
Page 351 - It renounces no just right from fear. It gives up no important truth from flattery. ( It is indeed not only consistent with a firm mind, but it necessarily requires a manly spirit, and a fixed principle, in order to give it any real value. Upon this solid ground only, the polish of gentleness can with advantage be superinduced.
Page 568 - Weeping at the feet and head, I can see your falling tears, I can hear your sighs and prayers; Yet I smile and whisper this, — "I am not the thing you kiss; Cease your tears, and let it lie; It was mine, it is not I.
Page 557 - Why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? 'Tis the divinity that stirs within us; 'Tis Heaven itself that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man.
Page 220 - There are many more shining qualities in the mind of man, but there is none so useful as discretion ; it is this indeed which gives a value to all the rest, which sets them at work in their proper times and places, and turns them to the advantage of the person who is possessed of them. Without it, learning is pedantry, and wit impertinence ; virtue itself looks like weakness ; the best parts only qualify a man to be more sprightly in errors, and active to his own prejudice.
Page 183 - My mind to me a kingdom is ; Such perfect joy therein I find As far exceeds all earthly bliss That God or nature hath assigned ; Though much I want that most would have, Yet still my mind forbids to crave.

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