The Novels of Lord Lytton: Kenelm Chillingly. The coming race

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Page 52 - The stars of midnight shall be dear To her; and she shall lean her ear In many a secret place Where rivulets dance their wayward round, And beauty born of murmuring sound Shall pass into her face.
Page 303 - Btrongest fortress, or cleave its burning way from the van to the rear of an embattled host. If army met army, and both had command of this agency , it could be but to the annihilation of each. The age of war was therefore gone; but with the cessation of war other effects bearing upon the social state soon became apparent.
Page 435 - Vril-ya, it was singular to mark how it contrived to unite and to harmonize into one system nearly all the objects which the various philosophers of the upper world have placed before human hopes as the ideals of a Utopian future. It was a state in which war, with all its calamities, was deemed impossible, — a state in which the freedom of all and each was secured...
Page 334 - This argues strongly in favour of the existence in every animal of an immaterial principle similar to that which by its excellence and superior endowments places man so much above animals...
Page 303 - Zee, who, as an erudite professor in the College of Sages, had studied such matters more diligently than any other member of my host's family, this fluid is capable of being raised and disciplined into the mightiest agency over all forms of matter, animate or inanimate.
Page 294 - Company, to which my two brothers belonged, had just paid twenty thousand dollars), I wound up by repeating its glowing predictions of the magnificent future that smiled upon mankind, when the flag of freedom should float over an entire continent, and two hundred millions of intelligent citizens, accustomed from infancy to the daily use of revolvers, should apply to a cowering universe the doctrine of the Patriot Monroe.
Page 295 - held an opinion, almost amounting to conviction, in common, I believe, with many other lovers of natural knowledge, that the various forms under which the forces of matter are made manifest have one common origin; in other words, are so directly related and mutually dependent, that they are convertible, as it were, into one another, and possess equivalents of power in their action.
Page 276 - And now there came out of this building a form, human, — was it human? It stood on the broad way and looked around, beheld me and approached. It came within a few yards of me, and at the sight and presence of it an indescribable awe and tremor seized me, rooting my feet to the ground. It reminded me of symbolical images of Genius or Demon that are seen on Etruscan vases or limned on the walls of Eastern sepulchres, — images that borrow^the outlines of man, and are yet of another race.
Page 309 - ... ingenuity — irruptions of fire and water, the storms of subterranean winds and escaping gases. At the borders of the domain, and at all places where such peril might be apprehended, vigilant inspectors are stationed with telegraphic communication to the hall in which chosen sages take it by turns to hold perpetual sittings. These inspectors are always selected from the elder boys approaching the age of puberty, and on the principle that at that age observation is more acute and the physical...
Page 304 - If army met army, and both had command of this agency , it could be but to the annihilation of each. The age of war was therefore gone; but with the cessation of war other effects bearing upon the social state soon became apparent. Man was so completely at the mercy of man , each whom he encountered being able, if so willing, to slay him on the instant, that all notions of government . by force gradually vanished from political systems and forms of law.

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