The National Geographic Magazine, Volume 18

Front Cover
National Geographic Society, 1907
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Contents

The Bathing and Burning Ghats at Benares by ELIZA R SCIDMORE Foreign Secretary
118
How Long will the Coal Reserves of the United States Last? by MARIUS R CAMPBELL
129
Efforts to Obtain Greater Energy from Coal
138
Wolves
145
Archæology in the Air by ELIZA R SCIDMORE
148
The NATIONAL
148
Railway Routes in Alaska by Alfred H Brooks Geologist in Charge of Alaskan
165
The Maoris of New Zealand Illustrated
198
The Maoris of New Zealand by GILBERT H Grosvenor
199
A Recent Report from the Doubtful Island Region by JAMES D HAGUE
205
The High Sierra
213
an account of the work of the Reclamation Service by C
217
Salton Sea and the Rainfall of the Southwest by ALFRED J HENRY Professor of
244
Women and Children of the East
248
Notes on Central America
272
The Giant Spider Crab from Japan
280
The Rock City of Petra by FRANKLIN E HOSKINS
283
Reclaiming the Swamp Lands of the United States by HERBERT WILSON U S Geo
292
The Revolution in Russia by WILLIAM ELEROY CURTIS
302
Some of Our Immigrants by GILBERT H Grosvenor
317
The Black RepublicLiberia by Sir HARRY JOHNSTON and U S Minister Lyon
334
Oreboat Unloaders
343
Echoes of the San Francisco Earthquake by ROBERT E C STEARNS
351
Bighorn Mountains by N H Da of the U S Geological Survey
355
Picturesque Paramaribo by HARRIET CHALMERS ADAMS
365
An Impression of the Guiana Wilderness by Professor ANGELO HEILPRIN of Yale Uni
373
Our Fish Immigrants by Hugh M Smith Deputy U S Commissioner of Fisheries
385
Fishes that Build Nests and Take Care of Their Young
400
Notes on the Remarkable Habits of Certain Turtles and Lizards by H A LARGELAMB
413
Commercial and Financial Statistics of the Principal Countries of the World by O
420
Notes
428
Seventyfive Days in the Arctics by MAX FLEISCHMAN Life Member of the National
439
Substance of an address to the National Geographic Society by ROBERT
446
I
535
Saint Stephens Fête in Budapest by DE WITT CLINTON FALLS
548
Strange Sights in Faraway Papua by A E PRATT
559
BoliviaA Country Without a Debt by Señor Y CALDERON Minister from Bolivia
573
Our Heralds of Storm and Flood by GILBERT H GROSVENOR
586
The Work in the Pacific Ocean of the Magnetic Survey Yacht Galilee by L A BAUER
601
Hunting the Grizzly in British Columbia Joseph Wendle
612
A Strange and Remarkable Beast
620
Tirnova the City of Hanging Gardens by FELIX J KOCH
632
Geologists in China
640
Koyasan the Japanese Valhalla by ELIZA R Scidmore
650
An Experimental Boat of Dr Alexander Graham Bell driven by Aerial Propellers
671
The Deepwater Route from Chicago to the Gulf by GILBERT H GROSVENOR
679
37
683
The Marvelous Prosperity of the South
685
D
686
Queer Methods of Travel in Curious Corners of the World by O P AUSTIN Chief
687
Planting Fishes in the Ocean by GEORGE M BOWERS U S Commissioner of Fish
715
Hunting Big Game in Portuguese East Africa
723
A Visit to Lonely Iceland by PERLEY H Noyes
731
The Land of Fire by JON STEFANSSON
741
Meetings of National Geographic Society
750
MadeiraOn the Way to Italy by DAVID FAIRCHILD
751
A Simple Method of Proving that the World Is Round by ROBERT MARSHALL BROWN
771
The Modern Alchemist by JAMES WILSON Secretary of Agriculture
781
ENRཥྞཚབ ཁྐྲསླ
792
Helping the Filipino Fisheries
795
American Explorations in Egypt
801
129
811
Published by the National Geographic Society
822
Proposed Change in the ByLaws of the National Geographic Society
825
138
831

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Page 524 - No public forest reservation shall be established, except to improve and protect the forest within the reservation or for the purpose of securing favorable conditions of water flows and to furnish a continuous supply of timber...
Page 64 - They can show to the world an honorable, peaceful conference of eighteen independent American Powers, in which all shall meet together on terms of absolute equality; a conference in which there can be no attempt to coerce a single Delegate against his own conception of the interests of his nation; a conference which will permit no secret understanding on any subject, but will frankly publish to the world all its conclusions; a conference which will tolerate no spirit of conquest, but will aim to...
Page 386 - I wind about, and in and out, With here a blossom sailing, And here and there a lusty trout, And here and there a grayling...
Page 72 - ... and manufacturers should have to send their goods and letters to South America via Europe if they wish security and dispatch. Even on the Pacific, where our ships have held their own better than on the Atlantic, our merchant flag is now threatened through the liberal aid bestowed by other Governments on their own steam lines. I ask your earnest consideration of the report with which the Merchant Marine Commission has followed its long and careful inquiry.
Page 298 - That the proceeds of said lands, whether from sale or by direct appropriation in kind, shall be applied, exclusively, as far as necessary, to the purpose of reclaiming said lands by means of the levees and drains aforesaid.
Page 5 - I have brought to a close the portion of the work which seemed to be specially mine — the demonstration of the practicability of mechanical flight — and for the uext stage, which is the commercial and practical development of the idea, it is probable that the world may look to others.
Page 64 - ... comprehension of the future, undertook to inaugurate a new era of American relations which should supplement political sympathy by personal acquaintance, by the intercourse of expanding trade, and by mutual helpfulness. As Secretary of State under President Arthur, he invited the American nations to a conference to be held on the 24th of November, 1882, for the purpose of considering and discussing the subject of preventing war between the nations of America.
Page 63 - America is strongest as a field for manufactures; it has comparatively little coal and iron. In many respects the people of the two continents are complementary to each other; the South American is polite, refined, cultivated, fond of literature and of expression, and of the graces and charms of life, while the North American is strenuous, intense, utilitarian. Where we accumulate, they spend. While we have less of the cheerful philosophy which finds sources of happiness in the existing conditions...
Page 69 - Government in raising the standard of living and wages, liy the protective tariff; the other by foreign governments in paying subsidies to their ships for the promotion of their own trade. For the American shipowner it is not a contest of intelligence, skill, industry, and thrift against similar qualities in his competitor : it is a contest against his competitors and his competitors' governments and his own government also.
Page 63 - ... substantially copied or adapted from our own. Under the new conditions of tranquillity and security which prevail in most of them their eager invitation to immigrants from the Old World will not long pass unheeded. The pressure of population abroad will inevitably turn its streams of life and labor toward those fertile fields and valleys. The streams have already begun to flow ; more than two hundred thousand immigrants entered the Argentine Republic last year ; they are coming this year at the...

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