The Story of American Painting: The Evolution of Painting in America from Colonial Times to the Present

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Frederick A. Stokes Company, 1907 - 396 pages
 

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Page 83 - Our day of dependence, our long apprenticeship to the learning of other lands, draws to a close. The millions that around us are rushing into life cannot always be fed on the sere remains of foreign harvests.
Page 288 - And when the evening mist clothes the riverside with poetry, as with a veil, and the poor buildings lose themselves in the dim sky, and the tall chimneys become campanili, and the warehouses are palaces in the night, and the whole city hangs in the heavens, and fairy-land is before us...
Page 288 - ... riverside with poetry, as with a veil, and the poor buildings lose themselves in the dim sky, and the tall chimneys become campanili, and the warehouses are palaces in the night, and the whole city hangs in the heavens, and fairy-land is before us - then the wayfarer hastens home; the working man and the cultured one, the wise man and the one of pleasure, cease to understand, as they have ceased to see, and Nature, who, for once, has sung in tune, sings her exquisite song to the artist alone...
Page 6 - O sinner ! Consider the fearful danger you are in : it is a great furnace of wrath, a wide and bottomless pit, full of the fire of wrath, that you are held over in the hand of that God, whose wrath is provoked and incensed as much against you, as against many of the damned in hell.
Page 288 - Nature contains the elements, in colour and form, of all pictures, as the keyboard contains the notes of all music. But the artist is born to pick, and choose, and group with science, these elements, that the result may be beautiful — as the musician gathers his notes, and forms his chords, until he bring forth from chaos glorious harmony.
Page 30 - To promote the cultivation of the Fine Arts, in the United States of America, by introducing correct and elegant copies from works of the first Masters in Sculpture and Painting, and by thus Facilitating the access to such Standards, and also by occasionally conferring moderate but honourable premiums, and otherwise assisting the Studies and exciting the efforts of the Artists gradually to unfold, enlighten, and invigorate the talents of our Countrymen.
Page 95 - I have endeavoured to treat my subjects as a dramatic writer; my picture is my stage, and men and women my players, who by means of certain actions and gestures, are to exhibit a dumb show.
Page 6 - ... soul; and you will absolutely despair of ever having any deliverance, any end, any mitigation, any rest at all; you will know certainly that you must wear out long ages, millions of millions of ages, in wrestling and conflicting with this almighty, merciless vengeance; and then when you have so done, when so many ages have actually been spent by you in this manner, you will know that all is but a point to what remains.
Page 220 - Portraits occupied him principally, though he made some eif orts to break away from them and indulge himself in imaginative subjects. In 1857 he was elected an associate of the National Academy. The most notable feature of this period of his life was the determination he made, as expressed in a letter to his friend Brown : " I have concluded," he wrote, " to see nature for myself, through the eye of no one else, and put my trust in God, awaiting the result.
Page 289 - ... and the cultured one, the wise man and the one of pleasure, cease to understand, as they have ceased to see, and Nature, who for once has sung in tune, sings her exquisite song to the artist alone — her son and her master — her son in that he loves her, her master in that he knows her. To him her secrets are unfolded, to him her lessons have become gradually clear.

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