The Complete Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: With an Introductory Essay Upon His Philosophical and Theological Opinions, Volume 1

Front Cover
Harper, 1884
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 242 - And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit.
Page 421 - For he established a testimony in Jacob, and appointed a law in Israel, which he commanded our fathers, that they should make them known to their children: That the generation to come might know them, even the children which should be born; who should arise and declare them to their children : That they might set their hope in God, and not forget the works of God, but keep his commandments...
Page 446 - For it pleased the Father, that in him should all fulness dwell; (and having made peace through the blood of his cross) by him to reconcile all things unto himself, — by him, I say, whether they be things in earth or things in heaven.
Page 180 - Every rank of creatures, as it ascends in the scale of creation, leaves death behind it or under it. The metal at its height of being seems a mute prophecy of the coming vegetation, into a mimic semblance of which it crystallizes.
Page 180 - These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created in the day that the LORD God made the earth and the heavens...
Page 434 - At the annunciation of principles, of ideas, the soul of man awakes and starts up, as an exile in a far distant land at the unexpected sounds of his native language, when after long years of absence, and almost of oblivion, he is suddenly addressed in his own mothertongue.
Page 446 - And he is the head of the body, the church : who is the beginning, the first-born from the dead ; that in all things he might have the pre-eminence.
Page 39 - But as young men, when they knit and shape perfectly, do seldom grow to a further stature ; so knowledge, while it is in aphorisms and observations, it is in growth ; but when it once is comprehended in exact methods, it may perchance be further polished and illustrated, and accommodated for use and practice ; but it increaseth no more in bulk and substance.
Page 82 - Christianity is not a theory or a speculation; but a life. Not a, philosophy of life, but a life and a living process.
Page 366 - ... he had pronounced a message of inestimable importance, and well worthy of that splendid apparatus of prophecy and miracles with which his mission was introduced, and attested ; a message in which the wisest of mankind would rejoice to find an answer to their doubts, and rest to their inquiries. It is idle to say, that a future state had been discovered already : — it had been discovered, as the Copernican system was ; — it was one guess among many.

Bibliographic information