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CALLISTRATUS.

ODE ON HARMODIUS.

IN

myrtles veil'd will I the falchion wear;
For thus the patriot sword

Harmodius and Aristogeiton bare,

When they the tyrant's bosom gored; And bade the men of Athens be Regenerate in equality.

Oh beloved Harmodius! never

Shall death be thine, who livest for ever!
Thy shade, as men have told, inherits

The islands of the blessed spirits;

Where deathless live the glorious dead;

Achilles fleet of foot, and Diomed.

In myrtles veil'd will I the falchion wear;
For thus the patriot sword

Harmodius and Aristogeiton bare,

When they the tyrant's bosom gored When, in Minerva's festal rite,

They closed Hipparchus' eyes in night.

Harmodius' praise, Aristogeiton's name

Shall bloom on earth with undecaying fame: Who, with the myrtle-wreathed sword,

The tyrant's bosom gored;

And bade the men of Athens be

Regenerate in equality.

Lycophron.

LYCOPHRON.

Bef. Ch. 304.

ALEXANDRA OR CASSANDRA.

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ENGLISH TRANSLATOR: MEEN, IN HIS REMARKS."

LYCOPHRON was a native of Chalcis in Euboea; and was one of the seven poets, under Ptolemy Philadelphus, king of Ægypt, who were formed into the poetical constellation of the Pleiads. These were Lycophron, Theocritus, Aratus, Nicander, Apollonius, Philicus, and Homerus the younger. Lycophron died by the wound of an arrow. Twenty tragedies of his composition are lost.

The prophetical rhapsody of Cassandra procured for its author the title of the "tenebrous poet;" and may well be said to consist of "dark sayings on the harp." This singular poem is, however, the production of decided genius. The symbolical language and hieroglyphical painting of prophecy are well imitated. The troubled imagination and agonized mind of Cassandra, occasionally, break forth in a very pathetic manner; and the style is bold and splendid.

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