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" What have I to do with the sacredness of traditions, if I live wholly from within?" my friend suggested, — "But these impulses may be from below, not from above." I replied, "They do not seem to me to be such; but if I am the Devil's child. I will live... "
Twelve Essays - Page 42
by Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1849 - 261 pages
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Select Essays and Addresses, Including The American Scholar

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1922 - 275 pages
...church. On my saying, What have I to do with the sacredness of traditions, if I live wholly from within? my friend suggested, — "But these impulses may be...replied, " They do not seem to me to be such ; but if 1 »" the Devil's child, I will live then from the Devil." No law can be sacred to me but that of my...
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The Literary Digest International Book Review

Clifford Smyth - 1925
...but must explore if it be goodness. Nothinc is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind. ... No law can be sacred to me but that of my nature." Emerson's writings are strewn with pregnant sentences like these, sentences full of enthusiasm, of...
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Adventures in Essay Reading: Essays Selected by the Department of Rhetoric ...

University of Michigan. Dept. of Rhetoric and Journalism - 1924 - 428 pages
...church. On my saying, What have I to do with the sacredness of traditions, if I live wholly from within? my friend suggested, "But these impulses may be from...Devil." (No law can be sacred to me but that of my naturej Good and bad are but names very readily transferable to that or this; the only right is what...
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The Revolt of Modern Youth

Ben Barr Lindsey, Wainwright Evans - 1925 - 354 pages
...church. On my saying, What have I to do with the sacredness of traditions, if I live wholly from within? my friend suggested — But these impulses may be...the devil's child, I will live then from the devil." I commend that passage from Emerson to the consideration of anybody who finds an incongruity in Jerry...
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The Rebellious Puritan: Portrait of Mr. Hawthorne

Lloyd R. Morris - 1927 - 367 pages
...man must be a nonconformist. . . . Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of our own mind. ... If I am the devil's child, I will live then from the...No law can be sacred to me but that of my nature." This was exciting doctrine. It made you the center and final arbiter of your world. It made you self-reliant...
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Conditions Handsome and Unhandsome: The Constitution of Emersonian ...

Stanley Cavell - 1990 - 151 pages
...direction, hence, in one sense, no path (plottable from outside the journey). (From "Self-Reliance" : "If I am the Devil's child, I will live then from the Devil." The idea is that attempting not to live so would not protect the world from the fact of you, probably...
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Nathaniel Hawthorne: Tradition and Revolution

Charles Swann - 1991 - 284 pages
...On my saying, "What have I to do with the sacredness of traditions, if I live wholly from within?" my friend suggested, - "But these impulses may be...seem to me to be such; but if I am the Devil's child, 1 will live then from the Devil."1 In effect what Septimius is doing as he responds to his adviser,...
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New Essays on Hawthorne's Major Tales

Amn Bell - 1993 - 155 pages
...being recognized as one of God's adopted - declaring, in the formula Emerson made bold to appropriate, "If I am the Devil's child, I will live then from the Devil"; and most suitably, perhaps, if that tortured "I" could share the misery Dickinson called that "white...
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Knowledge and Belief in America: Enlightenment Traditions and Modern ...

William M. Shea, Peter A. Huff - 2003 - 376 pages
...the nation's constitution, or as the amending of its constitution. When he says in "Self-Reliance," "No law can be sacred to me but that of my nature," he is saying no more than Kant had said—that, in a phrase from "Fate," "we are law-givers" to the...
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The Translatability of Cultures: Figurations of the Space Between

Sanford Budick - 1996 - 348 pages
...the nation's constitution; or I have come to say, as amending our constitution. When he says there, "No law can be sacred to me but that of my nature," he is saying no more than Kant had said — that, in a phrase from "Fate," "we are law-givers," namely...
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