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" Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile, Hath not old custom made this life more sweet Than that of painted pomp? Are not these woods More free from peril than the envious court? Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, — The seasons... "
The Principles of Elocution: With Exercises and Notations for Pronunciation ... - Page 173
by Alexander Melville Bell - 1878 - 243 pages
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The Wisdom of Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 2002 - 228 pages
...golden oars the silver stream, And greedily devour the treacherous bait. Ursula — Much Ado III.i Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile, Hath not old...free from peril than the envious court? Here feel we not the penalty of Adam, The seasons' difference, as the icy fang And churlish chiding of the winter's...
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As You Like it

William Shakespeare - 2002 - 129 pages
...share Duke Senior's views and those who take sides with Touchstone (see 2, i, 2-4 and 2, 4, 13-14) Hath not old custom made this life more sweet Than that of painted pomp? Are not these woods More fee from peril than the envious court? and ' . . . now I am in Arden, the more fool I! When I was at...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 8

Allardyce Nicoll - 1955 - 192 pages
...brings into sharp focus that first act which has just culminated in the usurper's murderous malice. "Are not these woods more free from peril than the envious court?" Though the contrast is traditional, it comes upon us here, like so many things in Shakespeare, with...
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Trees: Woodlands and Western Civilization

Richard Hayman - 2003 - 261 pages
...the duke himself describes it in precisely those terms, recalling the male camaraderie of the hunt: Now my co-mates, and brothers in exile Hath not old...woods More free from peril than the envious Court? Even the adverse conditions of winter can be borne as the wind and the cold feelingly persuade me what...
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As You Like it: A Guide to the Play

Stephen J. Lynch - 2003 - 178 pages
...(1.3.67-70). Moreover, Duke Senior speaks as if he has been in Arden for a considerable stretch of time: "Hath not old custom made this life more sweet / Than that of painted pomp?" (2.1.2-3). The time scheme is clearly inconsistent and may reflect authorial carelessness, inconsistent...
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Re-visions of Shakespeare: Essays in Honor of Robert Ornstein

Robert Ornstein, Evelyn Gajowski - 2004 - 298 pages
...pastoral. fends country living and attacks the court, with its artificiality, danger, and competitiveness: "Hath not old custom made this life more sweet / Than...woods / More free from peril than the envious court?" (2.1.2-4; emphasis mine). Any fear that his forest society might merely reproduce structures of authority,...
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The Fictions of Romantic Tourism: Radcliffe, Scott, and Mary Shelley

George Dekker - 2005 - 314 pages
...satisfaction with this mode of living is suggested by Radcliffe's chapter epigraph from As You Like It. Are not these woods More free from peril than the envious court? Here feel we not the penalty of Adam, The season's difference, as the icy fang And churlish chiding of the winter's...
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Sister to the Sioux: The Memoirs of Elaine Goodale Eastman, 1885-91

Elaine Goodale Eastman - 2004 - 175 pages
...children never questioned the somewhat wistful motto which hung in the entry opposite our front door: "Hath Not Old Custom Made This Life More Sweet Than That of Painted Pomp." Still, even in the days when with a child's uncritical enthusiasm I held my home to be uniquely desirable,...
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Shakespeare's Webs: Networks of Meaning in Renaissance Drama

Arthur F. Kinney - 2004 - 168 pages
...in order to vary and embellish a veritable anthology of pastoral topoi. Thus an initial proposition ("Hath not old custom made this life more sweet / Than that of painted pomp?) is first rephrased and then amplified by another ("Here feel we not the penalty of Adam"), which is...
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Shakespeare's Songbook, Volume 1

Ross W. Duffin, Fynette H Kulas Professor of Music Ross W Duffin - 2004 - 528 pages
...PRACTISES OF THREE LINCOLNE-SHIRE WITCHES (1619). Pepys Library, Magdalene College, Cambridge. DUKE SENIOR: The season's difference, as the Icy fang And churlish chiding of the winters wind, Which when it bites and blows upon my body Even till I shrink with cold, I smile, and...
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