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" To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men, — that is genius. Speak your latent conviction, and it shall be the universal sense ; for the inmost in due time becomes the outmost, and our... "
Twelve Essays - Page 38
by Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1849 - 261 pages
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American Philosophy: A Historical Anthology

Barbara MacKinnon - 1985 - 688 pages
...genius. Speak your latent conviction, and it shall be the universal sense; for the inmost in due time becomes the outmost, and our first thought is rendered back to us by the trumpets of Last Judgment. Familiar as the voice of the mind is to each, the highest merit we ascribe to Moses,...
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Wilderness Lost: The Religious Origins of the American Mind

David Ross Williams - 1987 - 293 pages
...by Emerson: "To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men, that is genius. Speak your latent...conviction, and it shall be the universal sense." And I have tried to live up to George Bancroft's advice to his fellow historian Jared Sparks: "Do not...
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On Emerson

Edwin Harrison Cady, Louis J. Budd, Professor Louis J Budd - 1988 - 282 pages
...of his own convictions, for he had long held that our first and third thoughts coincide, 48 and that "our first thought is rendered back to us by the trumpets of the Last Judgment." 49 We lie [he wrote] in the lap of immense intelligence, which makes us receivers of its truth and...
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Emerson's Pragmatic Vision: The Dance of the Eye

David Jacobson - 2010
...own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart, is true for all men,—that is genius. Speak your latent conviction and it shall be the universal sense" (CW 2:27). These sentences describe a hyperbolic conception of freedom, freedom conceived as the immediate...
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Microsociology: Discourse, Emotion, and Social Structure

Thomas J. Scheff - 1990 - 214 pages
...added). [1] To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men — that is genius. Speak your...conviction, and it shall be the universal sense; for the inmost in due time becomes the outmost, and our first thought is rendered back to us by the trumpets...
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The Senses of Walden: An Expanded Edition

Stanley Cavell - 1992 - 160 pages
...Emerson: "To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart, is true for all men — that is genius. Speak your...sense; for always the inmost becomes the outmost" ("Self-Reliance"). The substantive disagreement with Heidegger, shared by Emerson and Thoreau, is that...
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The New England Milton: Literary Reception and Cultural Authority in the ...

Kevin P. Van Anglen - 1993 - 255 pages
...own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart, is true for all men,—that is genius. Speak your latent conviction and it shall be the universal sense; for the inmost in due time becomes the outmost,—and our first thought is rendered back to us by the trumpets...
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Microsociology: Discourse, Emotion, and Social Structure

Thomas J. Scheff - 1990 - 214 pages
...conviction, and it shall be the universal sense; for the inmost in due time becomes the outmost, and our^rm thought is rendered back to us by the trumpets of the Last Judgment. [2] A man should learn to detect and watch that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within,...
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Pragmatism: A Contemporary Reader

Russell B. Goodman - 1995 - 317 pages
...Emerson: "To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart, is true for all men — that is genius. Speak your...sense; for always the inmost becomes the outmost" ("Self-Reliance"). The substantive disagreement with Heidegger, shared by Emerson and Thoreau, is that...
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From Emerson to King: Democracy, Race, and the Politics of Protest

Anita Haya Patterson - 1997 - 272 pages
...because of this striking and inexplicable but inevitable convergence of public and private. He writes, "Speak your latent conviction, and it shall be the universal sense; for the inmost in due time becomes the outmost, — and our first thought is rendered back to us by the...
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