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" See the wretch that long has tost On the thorny bed of pain, At length repair his vigour lost, And breathe and walk again ; The meanest floweret of the vale, The simplest note that swells the gale, The common sun, the air, the skies, To him are opening... "
The Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature - Page 13
1847
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 81

William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, William Smith, Sir John Murray IV, Rowland Edmund Prothero (Baron Ernle), George Walter Prothero - 1847
...constituted student in Nature's school, every sense becomes an inlet to pure enjoyment; and we shall see that ' The meanest floweret of the dale, The simplest note that swells (he gale, The common sun, the air, the skies, To her are opening Paradise.' Ever on the look-out for...
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Sacred Philosophy of the Seasons: Illustrating the Perfections of ..., Volume 2

Henry Duncan - 1847
...pain, At length repair his vigor lost, And breathe and walk again. " The meanest flow'ret of the vale, The simplest note that swells the gale, The common sun, the air, ^he skies, To him are opening paradise."* So says the poet, with equal beauty and correctness. Every...
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Methodist Hymnology: Comprehending Notices of the Poetical Works of John and ...

David Creamer - 1848 - 470 pages
...pain, At length repair his vigor lost, And breathe and walk again ; The meanest flow'ret of the vale, The simplest note that swells the gale, The common sun, the air, the skies, 2<> him are open in paradise-" HTMN 262. " I'll praise my Maker while I've breath."— Watts. " Praise...
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The Library of Poetry and Song, Volume 2

William Cullen Bryant - 1925 - 1100 pages
...stars, and blossoms in the trees. Essay on Man, Epistle I. POPE. The meanest floweret of the vale, The simplest note that swells the gale, The common sun, the air, the skies, To him are opening paradise. Ode : On the. Pleasure arising from Vicissitude. T. GRAY. All are but parts...
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The Muse in Council: Being Essays on Poets and Poetry

John Drinkwater - 1925 - 303 pages
...poet's expression. He did this not only in such isolated passages as: 'The meanest floweret of the vale, The simplest note that swells the gale, The common sun, the air, the skies, To him are opening Paradise,' but also, with very few lapses, throughout a whole poem. The 'Elegy Written...
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The Quarterly review, Volume 81

1847
...constituted student in Nature's school, every sense becomes an inlet to pure enjoyment; and we shall see that ' The meanest floweret of the dale, The simplest...such a tour to the iron frame of man, is borne with unrepining patience by a woman — and this too, as she gracefully says, ' an invalid who had only...
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Aspects of Eighteenth Century Nature Poetry

Cecil V. Deane - 1967 - 145 pages
...than in the unfinished Ode on the Pleasure Arising from Vicissitude: The meanest flowret of the vale The simplest note that swells the gale The common sun, the air, the skies, To him are opening Paradise. Here the touch is almost Wordsworthian, though there is also, in the string...
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Benjamin Rush's Lectures on the Mind

Benjamin Rush - 1981 - 735 pages
...pain "At length repair his vigor lost, "And breathe, and walk again. "The meanest flowret of the vale, "The simplest note that swells the gale, "The common sun, the air, the skies, "To him, are opening paradise. "3 Memoirs of Dr. Joseph Priestley to the Year l795, Written by Himself,...
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A Mind For Ever Voyaging: Wordsworth at Work Portraying Newton and Science

W. K. Thomas, Warren U. Ober, Warren Ober - 1989 - 328 pages
...at least a possible source and influence for the lines on Science: The meanest floweret of the vale, The simplest note that swells the gale, The common sun, the air, the skies To him are opening Paradise. For Wordsworth, great height and great depth were often interchangeable;...
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Thomas Hardy: A Literary Life

J. Gibson - 1996 - 206 pages
...about the invalid who at length is able to 'breathe and walk again': The meanest flowret of the vale, The simplest note that swells the gale, The common sun, the air, the skies, To him are opening Paradise. In that spring the call of Wessex to Hardy must have been strong. London...
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