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" O, how wretched Is that poor man that hangs on princes' favours ! There is, betwixt that smile we would aspire to, That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin, More pangs and fears than wars or women have : And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never... "
The Works of Shakespeare: Collated with the Oldest Copies, and Corrected - Page 359
by William Shakespeare - 1773
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The Boy's Second Help to Reading: A Selection of Choice Passages from ...

Theodore Alors W. Buckley - 1854 - 312 pages
...princes' favours ! There is betwixt that smile he would aspire to, That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin, More pangs and fears than war or women have...falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again: Why, how now, Cromwell ? Crom. I have no power to speak, sir. Wol. What, amazed At my misfortunes ?...
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An Address Delivered by the Rev. Theodore Parker, Before the New York City ...

Theodore Parker - 1854 - 46 pages
...smile lie would aspire to, That sweet aspect of voters, and their ruin, More pangs and fears than wars or women have; And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again ! " Mr. DOUGLASS also is finished ; the success of hk measure is his own defeat. Mr. PIERCE has three...
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Outlines of History: Illustrated by Numerous Geographical and Historical ...

Marcius Willson - 1854 - 600 pages
...smile we would aspire to, That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin, More pangs and fears than wars or women have; And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again." "Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition ; By that sil tell the angels ; how can man then, - Tbe...
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A physician's tale, Volume 2

Heberden Milford - 1854
...smile we would aspire to That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin, More pangs and fears than wars or women have ; And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again.' " Thus Lord Squanderficld, in his rambling, loquacious way, delivered himself; and as usual, made what...
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The Standard Speaker: Containing Exercises in Prose and Poetry for ...

1854
...smile he would aspire to, That sweet aspect of princes, and his ruin, More pangs and fears than wars or women have. And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again ! Out of thy honest truth, to play the woman. Let '.- dry our eyes : and thus far hear me, Cromwell...
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Beauties of the British Poets, with a Few Introd. Observations

George Croly (Rev., ed) - 1854
...man that hangs on princes' favours. There is, betwixt that smile we would aspire to, The sweet aspect of princes, and our ruin, More pangs and fears than war or women have ; 6* SHAKESPEARE. And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again. Cromwell, I did not...
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Our native land, or, Scenes and sketches from British history, by the author ...

British history - 1855
...smile we would aspire to, That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin, More pangs and fears than wars or women have ; And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again. — SHAKESPEARE. HENRY VII. was succeeded by his son Henry, who was not more than eighteen years of...
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Beyond Tragedy: Structure & Experience in Shakespeare's Romances, Volume 10

Robert W. Uphaus - 1981 - 150 pages
...smile we would aspire to, That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin, More pangs and fears than wars or women have; And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again. (III.ii.365-72) Then, after declaring, "The King has cur'd me, / I humbly thank his Grace" (380-81),...
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An Audition Handbook of Great Speeches

Jerry Blunt - 1990 - 207 pages
...smile we would aspire to, That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin, More pangs and fears than wars or women have; And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again. (57) Act III, Scene 2: Wolsey has just spoken with his faithful follower and pupil, Cromwell, who now...
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The Columbia Dictionary of Quotations

Robert Andrews - 1993 - 1092 pages
...smile we would aspire to. That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin. More pangs and fears than wars or women have. And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again. WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (1564-1616), English dramatist, poet. Cardinal Wolsey, in Henry VIII, acl 3, sc....
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