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" A man should learn to detect and watch that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his. In every work of genius we... "
Select American Classics: Being Selections from Irving's Sketch Book and ... - Page 49
1896
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A Theology Of Reading: The Hermeneutics Of Love

Alan Jacobs - 2009 - 448 pages
...the outmost,—and our first thought is rendered back to us by the trumpets of the Last Judgment. ... In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected...come back to us with a certain alienated majesty" (Essays 259). Even works of genius, then, cannot truly be gifts to us: They are merely our own possessions...
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Emerson and Self-reliance

George Kateb - 2002 - 221 pages
...Emerson memorably rebukes us for dismissing our thought without notice just because it is ours. He says: In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected...come back to us with a certain alienated majesty, (p. 259) Yet the earlier words are more suitable to the best meanings of self-reliance than the later...
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Emerson's Transcendental Etudes

Stanley Cavell, David Justin Hodge - 2003 - 277 pages
...within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice his own thought, because it is his. In every work of genius...come back to us with a certain alienated majesty." Here I find a specification of finding myself known in this text; in it certain rejected thoughts of...
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Stanley Cavell

Richard Eldridge, Charles and Harriett Cox McDowell Professor of Philosophy Richard Eldridge - 2003 - 248 pages
...from where we are. Cavell captures this point by focusing on Emerson's sentences from "Self-Reliance": "In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected...come back to us with a certain alienated majesty." As Cavell goes on to comment, these sentences propose that If the thoughts of a text such as Emerson's...
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An Introduction to the Philosophy of Art

Richard Eldridge, Charles and Harriett Cox McDowell Professor of Philosophy Richard Eldridge - 2003 - 285 pages
...by sharing the expressed visions of artists."89 According to Ralph Waldo Emerson in "Self-Reliance," "In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected...thoughts: they come back to us with a certain alienated majesty."90 This thought points toward both a way between Hegel and Danto on what is expressed and...
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Everyday and Prophetic: The Poetry of Lowell, Ammons, Merrill, and Rich

Nick Halpern - 2003 - 293 pages
...well. How can she say things like that in a way that isn't muted, ironic, guarded? Emerson writes, "In genius we recognize our own rejected thoughts: They...come back to us with a certain alienated majesty." 6 The evening grosbeaks in this poem seem to represent Rich's own rejected thoughts. Meanwhile, she...
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From Stress to Serenity: Gaining Strength in the Trials of Life

Angus Jenkinson - 2003 - 276 pages
...the gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his.' The soul or psyche or mind (which for my purposes at the moment are interchangeable terms differing...
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The Grammar of Good Intentions: Race and the Antebellum Culture of Benevolence

Susan M. Ryan (Ph. D.), Associate Professor of English Susan M Ryan, PH. - 2003 - 235 pages
...worth in himself" (36). The most "affecting lesson" of "great works of art," Emerson avers, is that "they teach us to abide by our spontaneous impression with good-humored inflexibility." Should we fail to achieve this tenacity, "to-morrow a stranger will say with masterly good sense precisely...
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The Second Great Awakening and the Transcendentalists

Barry Hankins - 2004 - 200 pages
...that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice...spontaneous impression with good-humored inflexibility then most when the whole cry of voices is on the other side. Else, to-morrow a stranger will say with masterly...
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Essays Series 1

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 2004 - 252 pages
...that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice...spontaneous impression with good-humored inflexibility then most when the whole cry of voices is on the other side. Else to-morrow a stranger will say with masterly...
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