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" A man should learn to detect and watch that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his. In every work of genius we... "
Select American Classics: Being Selections from Irving's Sketch Book and ... - Page 49
1896
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The Living Age, Volume 268

1911
...that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice his thought because it is his. Great works of art have no more affecting lesson than this." This is one of the curious things in the...
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The Good Life

Charles B. Guignon - 1999 - 325 pages
...that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice...spontaneous impression with good-humored inflexibility then most when the whole cry of voices is on the other side. Else to-morrow a stranger will say with masterly...
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Verging on Extra-vagance: Anthropology, History, Religion, Literature, Arts ...

James A. Boon - 1999 - 361 pages
...human, beginning from a famous early sentence of "Self-Reliance" I have already had occasion to cite: "In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected...come back to us with a certain alienated majesty." The idea of a majesty alienated from us is a transcription of the idea of the sublime as Kant characterizes...
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The Resurrection of Philip Clairmont

Martin Edmond - 1999 - 259 pages
...and uncompromising, we have to look if we want to see. <u 3 H In every work of genius we recognise our own rejected thoughts; they come back to us with a certain alienated majesty. Ralph Waldo Emerson 8 Not long after I began researching this subject, I had a dream in which the body...
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The American Reader: Words That Moved a Nation

Diane Ravitch - 2000 - 656 pages
...that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice...spontaneous impression with good-humored inflexibility then most when the whole cry of voices is on the other side. Else to-morrow a stranger will say with masterly...
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The Aesthetics of Enchantment in the Fine Arts, Volume 65

M. Kronegger, Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka - 2000 - 324 pages
...and God: "It takes me by surprise and yet is not unknown" (3); or, as he writes in "SelfReliance": "In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected...art have no more affecting lesson for us than this" (138). Because good art for Emerson is about revealing a natural fact or truth, when we experience...
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Speaking of Science

Jon Fripp, Michael Fripp, Deborah Fripp - 2000 - 241 pages
...just to realize the extent of your own ignorance. — Thomas Soweit, 1999 Quoted in Readers Digest In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected...come back to us with a certain alienated majesty. — Ralph Waldo Emerson We can lick gravity, but sometimes the paperwork is overwhelming. — Wernher...
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Coyote Satan Amerika: The Unspeakable Art and Performances of Reverend ...

Steven Johnson Leyba - 2015 - 100 pages
...the questioners? The American Revolutionaries? "In every work of genius we recognize our own refected thoughts: they come back to us with a certain alienated...teach us to abide by our spontaneous impression with good -humored inflexibility/' - Ralph Waldo Emerson, Self-Reliance POPPY: You've been the subject of...
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Nietzsche's Postmoralism: Essays on Nietzsche's Prelude to Philosophy's Future

Richard Schacht - 2001 - 264 pages
...has some sort of genius. True virtue is genius.62 Early in his essay "Self-Reliance" Emerson writes, "In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected...come back to us with a certain alienated majesty" (Essays and Lectures, p. 259). Such writing enacts the very phenomenon it describes. The burden of...
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Power Plays: Shakespeare's Lessons in Leadership and Management

John O. Whitney, Tina Packer - 2002 - 320 pages
...I thought: Who better than Emerson to solve Polonius's paradox, especially since Emerson also said, "In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected...come back to us with a certain alienated majesty." Then I read the essay more carefully. Emerson spoke beautifully to the first half of the paradox "To...
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